Archives for posts with tag: symbolism

It was almost a year ago that we posted about an incredible collaboration between Russian photographer Alexander Khokhlov, makeup artist Veronica Ershova, and floral stylist Mikhail Kravchenko. They have teamed up again for a series of striking photos entitled Bloomshapes and Illusions, where they explore photographic portraiture adapted from a variety of influences, such as minimalism and symbolism. They even employ an element of illusion in their work, which makes it that much more special. Particularly notable is their use of flowers, like their remarkable Marge Simpson piece. Here, they employ brilliantly white blooms with great success. The attention to detail and sheer artistry that goes into these photographs is astounding, as exhibited in the video below. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again… can’t wait to see what they come up with next!

Via alexanderkhokhlov.com and YouTube

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If you were thinking of invading any given place, the use of balloons would not likely be involved. Unless, of course, you’re an artist with a statement to make. Such is the case with French photographer/artist Charles Pétillon and his “Invasions” series. Pétillon uses white balloons of varying sizes as a way to “change the point of view that we encounter every day without regard to it. It is our view that I try to sharpen and to move from a practical perception to visual emotion.” Pétillon essentially fills spaces, both architectural and natural, with said balloons. The resulting visuals become metaphors for various themes. The house overflowing with balloons, for example, is a metaphor for family memories that spring from home. Pétillon says, “The white balloons symbolizing childhood naivety. This metaphor allows to ask us about family memory. How is it spread? Is it a universal need?” Other pieces in this visually arresting series include “Play Station 2,” a basketball net symbolizing the video game universe, and “Mutation 2” DNA structure symbolizing genetic modification. It must have been quite a feat handling such a massive amount of balloons, and still making them look quite beautiful and surreal.

Via charlespetillon.com

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Collage is often thought of as an amalgamation of different materials. But for Brooklyn-based artist Mark Wagner, his ongoing collage work is almost always comprised of a single material: one dollar bills. But to simply refer to what he creates as collages probably doesn’t do them justice. Wagner’s work is extremely intricate and meticulous; he gives purpose to the placement of each shred of currency. We don’t doubt that whatever the material, Wagner could compose a masterpiece beyond our wildest imagination. But part of the intrigue here is certainly the taboo nature of destroying dollar bills. In his own words, Wagner discusses his choice of material: “The one dollar bill is the most ubiquitous piece of paper in America. Collage asks the question: what might be done to make it something else? It is a ripe material: intaglio printed on sturdy linen stock, covered in decorative filigree, and steeped in symbolism and concept. Blade and glue transform it-reproducing the effects of tapestries, paints, engravings, mosaics, and computers—striving for something bizarre, beautiful, or unbelievable… the foreign in the familiar.”

Be sure to also check out the terrific process video below.

Via markwagnerinc.com

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