Archives for posts with tag: technology

With one of his latest masterpieces, Wreck, Brooklyn-based sculptor/artist Jordan Griska beautifully juxtaposes opulence and misfortune in a truly provocative way. Painstakingly crafted from over 12,000 individual pieces of mirror-finish stainless steel over the course of almost two years, Griska’s Wreck tells the story of a (life-size) Mercedes-Benz S550 involved in a fatality wreck. We are absolutely in awe of this piece, and Griska multi-disciplinary approach, from 3D modeling technology, engineering proficiency, precision laser cutting and good old fashioned hand assembly. Not only is this fascinating sculpture beautiful, but it also evokes very relevant and stimulating sociopolitical concepts surrounding wealth and debauchery. Griska says it best: “The perfect geometry and flawless materiality of the piece reflect the inspiration of idealized digital design, in stark contrast with the grimness of the reality it represents. Beauty, technology and engineering collide with death and reality.”

Via jordangriska.com

Jordan Griska's Wreck on view at Pier 9 today till Sunday, 11 – 7. Across from @fringearts #pcwreck

A post shared by Philadelphia Contemporary (@philadelphiacontemporary) on

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We have long commented on the convergence of history and art. They are intrinsically intertwined, reliant on one another in many ways. So when an artist turns the documentation and storytelling aspect of said junction on its head, we surely take notice. For his series The American Revolution Revolution, Denver-based artist Shawn Huckins masterfully juxtaposes early American portraiture with social media jargon. Thoughtfully conceptualized and brilliantly executed, Huckins’s incredible work succeeds on so many levels. And it’s also important to note that these are physical paintings, should Huckins’s artistic ability ever come into question. Huckins is a superb American artist who is clearly inspired by American Neo-Classical painters, as well as more contemporary Pop artists. In his own words, Huckins explains the series: “The American Revolution was conceived through an exchange of a few well-formed ideas communicated in person and by handwritten letters. Imagine what George & Co. could have done with the Internet. Or not. Technology influences how much we know and what we believe, as well as how quickly and intelligently we convey our ideas. But does how we communicate govern the value of what we communicate? The physical act of typing very fast on small devices has undeniably impacted spelling, grammar, and punctuation, encouraging a degree of illiteracy that has become the new social norm. As goes our grammatical literacy, do our social and cultural literacies follow?”

Via shawnhuckins.com

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Just this week, Uber unveiled a global rebranding that not only strayed a bit from its recognizable logotype, but also introduced a rather detached set of app icons. Can’t say that we suffered from extreme design envy over the previous Uber logotype, but it was fine. While their new logotype seems like a step in the right direction (thicker letterforms and tighter composition for maximum readability), the highbrow concept behind the app icons and larger identity seems rather misguided, and will surely be lost on most. Yes, Uber’s official statement references “bits and atoms” (“The unique aspect of Uber is that we exist in the physical world. When you push a button on your phone, a car moves across the city and appears where you are. We exist in the place where bits and atoms come together. That is Uber. We are not just technology but technology that moves cities and their citizens.”) In theory, the thought process behind the concept, which is customized identities for specific markets that aim to draw colors and patterns from “art, architecture, tradition, old and new fashion, textiles, the environment”, is a thoughtful one. But from a branding perspective, it seems to dilute the impact of the Uber brand as a whole. And that doesn’t even address that larger concern that the icon itself is not identifiable in any way as Uber. Though we had issues with the previous icon employing a dissimilar “U” letterform from the Uber logotype, at least it was just that, a letter U. This icon, or rather set of icons – one for riders, another for divers – make no effort to resemble the new Uber logotype in any way. Why abandon the “U”? Our view is not the basis of some pretentious design theory, but simple human nature. In our estimation, the biggest stumble here was not hiring branding experts for the task. We are not knocking in-house designers… they are often immensely talented with an invaluable familiarity and investment in a given brand. But this was surely not a 12+ months-long task meant to be spearheaded by a non-designer CEO. There are experts in the field who do this sort of thing, we are among them. We hear the cry among our peers: “Help us help you!” Sure, the presentation of Uber’s new identity is slick, but the principals behind the design concept as a whole indicate a lack of design leadership. An unfortunate case of just looking pretty, but not meeting a brand’s true potential.

Visuals via Uber

 

 

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After:

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New look. Same ride.

A post shared by Uber (@uber) on

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As we’ve mentioned before (here and here and here), 3D rendering has come a really long way in recent years. With technology advancing exponentially, the world of three-dimensional work has gotten more real, to the point that it’s sometimes difficult to discern what’s computer generated and what’s actually real. This gorgeous series, GoldRush, by Slovenian designer Črtomir Just exemplifies that fine line. We all know that these items aren’t actually made of gold, but Just nearly makes us believe it. In his own words, Just explains, “Since the world is obsessed with everything that’s golden, I decided to make a fun 3D series that takes the popular ‘gold’ naming for a spin and tries to depict these products literally or how they would look like, if they were truly made out of gold.”

Via Behance

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You may already be familiar with the work of contemporary American artist Scott Blake. Blake’s work is not only visually compelling, but also engaging and usually interactive. Some of his most prominent works involve bar codes (aptly called Barcode Art), which fittingly mock consumerism and the increasing societal dominance of big data. Blake has a clear love of technology, and uses it in incredible, sometimes controversial, ways. His “Chuck Close Filter” which emulated a technique made famous by the celebrated artist, for instance, was shut down by Close himself, citing jeopardy to his livelihood and trivializing his work. We are not even scratching the surface of Blake’s growing body of work, nor are we doing it much justice. Be sure to visit Blake’s site and take it all in first-hand.

Via barcodeart.com and YouTube

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Done well, photo manipulation can stop you in your tracks. Advances in software technology, particularly Photoshop, have allowed artists to explore surreal scenarios, once restricted to visions inside one’s head, like never before. The cultural and artistic movement known as surrealism began in the early 1920s, and arguably continues today to some degree, with the rise of said technological advances. One such artist engaging in making art that blurs the lines between dream and reality is Mumbai-based Anil Saxena. Saxena is particularly adept at Photoshop, and has a playful sort of style, but does not utilize his skills haphazardly. He creates thoughtful work, and is extremely detail oriented. In his own words, Saxena says “If the image is a success but my work goes unnoticed, I’m doing my job well.” We couldn’t agree more.

More current surrealist art here and here and here.

Via Behance

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It’s said that what’s old becomes new again… trends are cyclical to some degree. Our recent past (the 1980s) featured a rise in technology, and 8-bit graphics found in Atari and Nintendo gaming systems. These now rather primitive looking graphics have influenced fashion, music and entertainment, and in this case, art. New York-based artist Adam Lister has been exploring digitalized representations of famous works of art and pop culture figures through watercolor painting, and even 3D printing. Lister’s subjects have included everything from the Mona Lisa, to Monet, to Iron Man. All novelty aside, Lister’s work is an interesting examination in visual familiarity. Most of his works are extremely recognizable, yet they are simply made up of a series of large squares and rectangles, and most details are not apparent. Our visual cognition is quite powerful, and Lister capitalizes on just that, with great success.

Via adamlistergallery.com

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As technology advances, so too does our ability to track motion, as is exhibited by the iPhone, Fitbit, forthcoming Apple Watch, and others. But Canadian Stephen Orlando is more fixated with the beauty of motion, and innovative ways to capture it visually. Orlando, a mechanical engineer by trade, blurs the line between science and art in his stunning ongoing series Motion Exposure. By utilizing programmable LED lights and long exposure photography, Orlando is “able to tell the story of movement.” Though we’ve featured light painting before (here and here), Orlando’s work is a bit different. We love the spectrum of colors and intriguing patterns of motion he captures. In his own words, Orlando says “I’m fascinated with capturing motion through time and space into a single photograph…. This technique reveals beautiful light trails created by paths of familiar objects. These light trails have not been artificially created with Photoshop and represent the actual paths of the objects.” This growing series features motion captured by kayaking, canoeing, soccer, tennis, swimming and even waterfalls, and more. Absolutely beautiful.

Via motionexposure.com

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This is already the second time in a few months that we’ve posted about the work of Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac (previous post here). We are so taken with his work, which firmly addresses the notion that creativity and technology and science are not mutually exclusive, that we just had to share. In this series, Stardust, Albiac again explores technological processes to create generative works of art. The methodology behind this is admittedly over our heads, but the results are certainly impressive. Albiac basically uses images from the Hubble Space Telescope to compose portraits based on the concept of nucleosynthesis. He even solicited internet participation, which resulted in more than 15,000 works. In his own words, Albiac explains: “As a theme for this series of portraits, I’ve choosen the concept of nucleosynthesis or the process of creation of new atomic nuclei from pre-existing matter that takes place at cosmic scale. We humans, are believed to be novel combinations of cosmic stardust. It could be argued that the whole universe is the biggest running generative art installation today.”

Via sergioalbiac.com

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Australian artist Guy Whitby, otherwise known as WorkByKnight (or WBK) has a terrific eye for mosaic compositions, which (and we know from experience) is much more difficult and time consuming than it looks. These pixelated portraits are deceivingly complex, and serve as visual commentary for the global shift from analog to digital. Each piece is made up of a variety of computer keys, along with analog and digital buttons. WBK meticulously places each button and key to serve as a pixel, if you will. Though subjects vary, from celebrities and artists to musicians and political figures, to his most recent “Old School Tech” series of still life technological treasures, the quality of this remarkable work never falters. Truly amazing how strategic color choice and placement make otherwise analogous objects and shapes into something cohesive, and more importantly, recognizable.

More mosaic posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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