Archives for posts with tag: texture

Creative duo Michelle Maguire and Kelsey McClellan, otherwise known as Terrence Caviar, are a stylist and photographer team, respectively, whose latest project marries some of our favorites: color, series, and of course food. At its core, Wardrobe Snacks explores thoughtful pairings of various colors and textures. McClellan’s closely cropped photos perfectly capture Maguire’s monochromatic styling, all while touching on a familiar scenario: eating on the go. In their own words, Terrence Caviar describe the series in their own words: “Wardrobe Snacks was inspired by diners lacking the luxury of being seated at a table: Michelle’s stepdad who rests his sandwich on his thigh (hell with a plate!) in between bites while he blasts an action movie on his TV; a commuter cramped up on a crowded bus retrieving an item from a bag or pocket; a lunch-breaker on a park bench eating from her lap. They’re informal — perhaps even a bit awkward — spaces as far as eating is concerned, yet the diner always appears to be comfortable and perfectly satisfied with his chosen snack, almost zen-like.” Prints available here. More conceptual photography posts here and here and here.

Via terrencecaviar.com

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Michigan artist and educator Anne Mondro has a fascination with human anatomy, so pairing that interest with her superb crocheting skills was a natural union. Using thin copper and steel wire, Mondro creates beautifully intricate crocheted sculptures of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. In her own words, Mondro states, “My creative work explores the physical and emotional complexity of the human body. Intrigued by the ways the human body is experienced and valued in society, I create sculptures and images that investigate and portray various aspects of humanity. Crocheting (the process of using a hooked needle to pull loops from a continuous thread and working with one stitch at a time) enables the figures to interlace each other physically and metaphorically to express these aspects of humanity. The color and texture of the wire adds to the work by portraying the figures as ethereal silhouettes, evoking associations with mortality and spirituality.” This is not your grandmother’s needlework, that’s for certain.

Via annemondro.com and ceresgallery.org

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While client-driven work can certainly be fulfilling and satisfying in many ways, there’s something to be said for personal projects. Sure, they can be a little indulgent, but the lack of constraints and pressure, at least from outside sources, often yields fantastic results. As designers, the process is sort of freeing, and can lead to good things all around. Argentinian art director and motion designer Javier Tommasi knows this all too well. His ongoing project, Food for Life, showcases the fruits (quite literally) of his unpaid labor. Tommasi has spent months of his free time exploring new techniques to improve the overall quality of his work, and we are totally impressed. Not just with his dedication to the process, but with the caliber of his work. His renderings are amazing, and his sense of composition and lighting really make these pieces sing. Tommasi speaks to the concept, “I love the set design, product photography, 3D animation and I just wanted to make a mix between all stuff I like, giving an artistic touch. So, playing and proving colors, textures and lights, I did the designs. I had the idea to work with stuff to make me feel something natural, fresh, with vivid colors, and I thought in fruits and vegetables. So. I resolved to do set designs with natural and fresh fruits and vegetables adding extra objects with different textures like metal and gold to see the contrast between them.”

Via javitommasi.com and howww.com

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Given the late breaking, historical news that a NASA probe, launched some nine and a half years ago, and traveling an astounding 3 billion miles, has finally reached Pluto just hours ago, we thought it fitting to showcase this series of custom astronomy logos by Berlin-based designer Jonas Söder. We love Söder’s style here, sort of giving a nod to sci-fi graphics of the 1950s, but with a modern twist. His use of texture is quite nice, with a clear typographical prowess, as demonstrated by his custom letterforms. Out of this world, indeed.

Via Behance

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It’s no secret that we are totally taken with graphical interpretations of the alphabet, conceptual typography, and works that are done as a series. This gem of a project, by Paris-based designer Alexis Persani, gets high marks all around. Persani’s 3D illustration work is stellar. It doesn’t feel like the 3D is a gratuitous effect, but rather advances the concept of the figures. He is thoughtful in his choices, and presents each character as a sculpture that could stand on its own, paying particular attention to texture, lighting and color. Fantastic series that can be enjoyed by type geeks like us, or just about anyone else. Well done.

More experimental typography posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Dietlind Wolf is inherently creative. She seems to see the world around her a bit differently from the average person. This German visual multidisciplinary designer, prop-stylist and photographer’s eye for composition, color, texture is just exquisite. Her body of work really is something, but it would be impossible to feature it all here. We are particularly drawn to this series for German magazine Brigitte. We love the juxtaposition of sketchy illustration with prop styling. These could easily stand on their own. Be sure to check out all of her work, it’s like a masterclass.

Via dietlindwolf.blogspot.com

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Italian illustrator/designer Alberto Seveso employs some awesome Photoshop skills to merge contrasting textures for a very distinct design style. We’ve featured his work before, but had to share some of his latest work. From album artwork, to packaging for Adobe, Seveso is a true master of digital art. He brings a certain beauty and elegance to the medium. Incredible design inspiration.

Via burdu976.com

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We’ve seen the terrific typographic work of Bilbao, Spain-based designer Txaber before (here). His latest work, a custom typeface for Nike is a great addition to his body of work. It’s composed of wooden slats, but for some added texture and dimension, Txaber curls the top layers. And the result is quite beautiful.

Via txaber.net

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