Archives for posts with tag: thoughtful

It’s no surprise that we’re big fans of photographer Emily Blincoe (previous posts here and here). Blincoe splits her time between Austin (ampersand) Nashville, creating some compelling photography, that’s both thoughtful and fun. A quick look at her typographic ampersand series, now several years old and aptly titled “This Ampersand That”, is long overdue. We eat up (pun intended) series of this nature. Photography (ampersand) typography… is there anything better?

Via Tumblr

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Romania-born, New York City-based illustrator/designer/art director Daniel Nyari employs a distinct style of bulbous shapes and bold colors in a geometric and cubist sort of way. And we love it, as do his impressive roster of clients, which includes ESPN, Wired, GQ, Adidas, National Geographic, Microsoft, Men’s Health, among others. Nyari says he wants “to make art that looks like it was made by a computer which thinks it’s human.” His process is methodical and based on a grid, and this thoughtfulness shows. Nyari’s body of work is comprised of a great deal of football (soccer) projects, which is clearly a passion, and derives naturally from his European roots. But make no mistake, this is not a hobby for Nyari. He’s a terrific illustrator who has found his way and is making his mark in a crowded landscape of creatives.

Via iamdany.com

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Done well, photo manipulation can stop you in your tracks. Advances in software technology, particularly Photoshop, have allowed artists to explore surreal scenarios, once restricted to visions inside one’s head, like never before. The cultural and artistic movement known as surrealism began in the early 1920s, and arguably continues today to some degree, with the rise of said technological advances. One such artist engaging in making art that blurs the lines between dream and reality is Mumbai-based Anil Saxena. Saxena is particularly adept at Photoshop, and has a playful sort of style, but does not utilize his skills haphazardly. He creates thoughtful work, and is extremely detail oriented. In his own words, Saxena says “If the image is a success but my work goes unnoticed, I’m doing my job well.” We couldn’t agree more.

More current surrealist art here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Australian-born, Boston-based designer Dan Fleming has a very keen sense of typography and form. In this series, Word Animals, Flemming pushes the boundaries of letterforms to achieve illustrative representations of animals using the letters in their names. Some certainly work better than others, but we love the series as a whole. Licensing the designs to a kids’ clothing company wouldn’t be a bad idea… seems like the perfect audience for these fun, thoughtful designs. Vaguely reminiscent of another set of animal illustrations (here).

Via danflemingdesign.com

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3D graphics have really improved (and continue to) exponentially in recent years. Buenos Aires based design studio Six & Five, established by art directors/designers Andy Reisinger and Ezequiel Pini, really capitalize on such advancements in compelling ways. Their approach is really refined and thoughtful, and based on the fundamentals of good design. Their typographic treatments are particularly compelling, pushing the boundaries of computer generated imagery and reality. This project for the Abelina typeface (designed by fellow Argentinian Yanina Arabena, and available here) is really something, and reminiscent of some other typographic wonders (here and here and here). Their project entitled “Ride” is not too shabby either. These guys are masters!

Via sixnfive.com

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Award-winning, Sydney, Australia-based photographer Sébastien Millier has a fantastic story telling ability through both photography and written words. His thoughtful and expressive work really captures his subjects in a special way. We especially like his “Stories” series, specifically his Golden Soil project. There is something to be said for Millier’s writing, which is just as compelling as his photography (we love the appropriately golden cast of these photos). Millier brings to life something that could otherwise have come across as mundane. Golden Soil tells the story of an Australian mining site. An excerpt: “Broken Hill is a small town in outback New South Wales, Australia, a pocket of civilization in the middle of wide brown land. Flat, dry and rich in minerals, the surrounding area is a miner’s paradise, a kind of geological Las Vegas of unearthly proportions….”

Via sebastienmillier.com

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Chennai, India-based designer Arun Raj’s typographic exercise “Typography Word Play” is simply fun and clever. We appreciate Raj’s thoughtful, minimalistic approach.

Via Behance

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