Archives for posts with tag: three-dimensional renderings

While client-driven work can certainly be fulfilling and satisfying in many ways, there’s something to be said for personal projects. Sure, they can be a little indulgent, but the lack of constraints and pressure, at least from outside sources, often yields fantastic results. As designers, the process is sort of freeing, and can lead to good things all around. Argentinian art director and motion designer Javier Tommasi knows this all too well. His ongoing project, Food for Life, showcases the fruits (quite literally) of his unpaid labor. Tommasi has spent months of his free time exploring new techniques to improve the overall quality of his work, and we are totally impressed. Not just with his dedication to the process, but with the caliber of his work. His renderings are amazing, and his sense of composition and lighting really make these pieces sing. Tommasi speaks to the concept, “I love the set design, product photography, 3D animation and I just wanted to make a mix between all stuff I like, giving an artistic touch. So, playing and proving colors, textures and lights, I did the designs. I had the idea to work with stuff to make me feel something natural, fresh, with vivid colors, and I thought in fruits and vegetables. So. I resolved to do set designs with natural and fresh fruits and vegetables adding extra objects with different textures like metal and gold to see the contrast between them.”

Via javitommasi.com and howww.com

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As we’ve mentioned before (here and here and here), 3D rendering has come a really long way in recent years. With technology advancing exponentially, the world of three-dimensional work has gotten more real, to the point that it’s sometimes difficult to discern what’s computer generated and what’s actually real. This gorgeous series, GoldRush, by Slovenian designer Črtomir Just exemplifies that fine line. We all know that these items aren’t actually made of gold, but Just nearly makes us believe it. In his own words, Just explains, “Since the world is obsessed with everything that’s golden, I decided to make a fun 3D series that takes the popular ‘gold’ naming for a spin and tries to depict these products literally or how they would look like, if they were truly made out of gold.”

Via Behance

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While we generally appreciate 3D rendering and the technology behind it, we must admit that extraneous use of it (which is rather rampant) is not only irritating from a conceptual standpoint, but also has a general desensitizing effect. So we were surprised and delighted to come across the work of Athens, Greece-based architect Katerina Kamprani. Her ongoing series, fittingly titled The Uncomfortable, explores the redesign of useful objects to make them uncomfortable to use. Kamprani purposefully and thoughtfully reworks each item in twisted ways. She states. “[I] decided to create and design for all the wrong reasons. Vindictive and nasty? Or a helpful study of everyday objects?” Whatever the motivation, we love staring at these, imagining how (un)useful each object would be, and the depraved humor that would ensue. We salute Kamprani for designing with purpose and humor, nicely done.

Some more stellar 3D work here and here and here.

Via kkstudio.gr

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We love 3D work that is done thoughtfully and with purpose. And we also have a certain fondness for serial work… that is, work that is part of a series. This terrific set of numbers by Hamburg, Germany-based art director/designer/CGI artist Antoni Tudisco (along with Bucharest-based Andrei Brovcenco) certainly fits the bill. Commissioned by the Financial Times luxury lifestyle magazine, How To Spend It, these numeric characters are expertly constructed in a 3D universe to represent a variety of luxurious goods, including jewelry, gems, precious metals, plush fabrics, floral arrangements, upscale furniture, and even a sailboat. Thanks to incredible advances in 3D technology, and certainly the remarkable talents of Tudisco, the realism achieved here is phenomenal. Nicely done.

Via Behance

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What the…!? The unbelievable work of UK designer/illustrator Chris LaBrooy (previously featured here) elicits confusion, amazement and delight all at the same time. LaBrooy’s tremendously realistic (yet highly unlikely) 3D creations are nothing short of spectacular. We are particularly taken with his automobile works, which appropriately feature the words “aerobics” and “elasticity” in their titles… words obviously not associated with rigid metal motor vehicles, but perfectly normal in this twisted alter universe. LaBrooy takes digital manipulation to a whole other level, bending and stretching familiar objects with such precision. We absolutely love what LaBrooy is doing, and look forward to his future work.

Via chrislabrooy.com

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It’s no secret that we are totally taken with graphical interpretations of the alphabet, conceptual typography, and works that are done as a series. This gem of a project, by Paris-based designer Alexis Persani, gets high marks all around. Persani’s 3D illustration work is stellar. It doesn’t feel like the 3D is a gratuitous effect, but rather advances the concept of the figures. He is thoughtful in his choices, and presents each character as a sculpture that could stand on its own, paying particular attention to texture, lighting and color. Fantastic series that can be enjoyed by type geeks like us, or just about anyone else. Well done.

More experimental typography posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Digital three-dimensional renderings have come a long way. So far, in fact, that it’s often difficult to tell if something is real or rendered. South Korean digital artist/sculptor Kyuin Shim capitalizes on that obscured distinction in his digital sculptures. Focusing on dysmorphic views of the human body, Shim creates these fascinating, and in some ways, disconcerting human forms. There’s a paradox at play here… a certain beauty, yet depravity in the way Shim morphs these figures in unexpected ways.

Via Behance

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