Archives for posts with tag: three-dimensionality

In an effort to come full circle in recognizing the very polarizing Common Core testing in New York over the past two weeks, we bring you another “math meets art” post. This time it’s the work of Venezuelan architect and illustrator Rafael Araujo, and his very technical approach to capturing the mathematical brilliance of nature. With simple drafting tools (pencil, ruler, compass, protractor), Araujo takes much pleasure and pride being unplugged from technology while exploring three dimensionality (yes, without the aid of a computer), which can take up to 100 hours to create a single complex composition. We cannot wrap our brains around how one would even begin to approach this, so needless to say, we are in complete awe of Araujo. As are the thousands of backers who contributed to his Kickstarter campaign to publish a book of his work, which began several months ago with a goal just over $20,000. Araujo has since raised over a quarter of a million dollars to date, with the help of Sydney, Australia-based husband and wife team Melinda and Andres Restrepo. The Restrepos were so taken with Araujo’s work online, they approached him about creating a book. Capitalizing on the growing popularity of “adult coloring books” (c’mon, not X-rated, but those touting supposed “stress relieving” patterns), the project to publish the Golden Ratio Coloring Book is forging ahead. When you look at the sampling of Araujo’s work below, just keep in mind that they are all done by hand. Simply breathtaking.

Via rafael-araujo.com

Araujo-01 Araujo-02 Araujo-03 Araujo-04 Araujo-05 Araujo-06 Araujo-07 Araujo-08 Araujo-09 Araujo-10 Araujo-11 Araujo-13 Araujo-14Araujo-15

Advertisements

As we’ve mentioned before (here and here and here), 3D rendering has come a really long way in recent years. With technology advancing exponentially, the world of three-dimensional work has gotten more real, to the point that it’s sometimes difficult to discern what’s computer generated and what’s actually real. This gorgeous series, GoldRush, by Slovenian designer Črtomir Just exemplifies that fine line. We all know that these items aren’t actually made of gold, but Just nearly makes us believe it. In his own words, Just explains, “Since the world is obsessed with everything that’s golden, I decided to make a fun 3D series that takes the popular ‘gold’ naming for a spin and tries to depict these products literally or how they would look like, if they were truly made out of gold.”

Via Behance

Just-1 Just-2 Just-3 Just-4 Just-5 Just-6 Just-7

While we generally appreciate 3D rendering and the technology behind it, we must admit that extraneous use of it (which is rather rampant) is not only irritating from a conceptual standpoint, but also has a general desensitizing effect. So we were surprised and delighted to come across the work of Athens, Greece-based architect Katerina Kamprani. Her ongoing series, fittingly titled The Uncomfortable, explores the redesign of useful objects to make them uncomfortable to use. Kamprani purposefully and thoughtfully reworks each item in twisted ways. She states. “[I] decided to create and design for all the wrong reasons. Vindictive and nasty? Or a helpful study of everyday objects?” Whatever the motivation, we love staring at these, imagining how (un)useful each object would be, and the depraved humor that would ensue. We salute Kamprani for designing with purpose and humor, nicely done.

Some more stellar 3D work here and here and here.

Via kkstudio.gr

Kamprani-01 Kamprani-02 Kamprani-03 Kamprani-04 Kamprani-05 Kamprani-06 Kamprani-07 Kamprani-08 Kamprani-09 Kamprani-10 Kamprani-11 Kamprani-12 Kamprani-13 Kamprani-14 Kamprani-15 Kamprani-16 Kamprani-17 Kamprani-18

We love 3D work that is done thoughtfully and with purpose. And we also have a certain fondness for serial work… that is, work that is part of a series. This terrific set of numbers by Hamburg, Germany-based art director/designer/CGI artist Antoni Tudisco (along with Bucharest-based Andrei Brovcenco) certainly fits the bill. Commissioned by the Financial Times luxury lifestyle magazine, How To Spend It, these numeric characters are expertly constructed in a 3D universe to represent a variety of luxurious goods, including jewelry, gems, precious metals, plush fabrics, floral arrangements, upscale furniture, and even a sailboat. Thanks to incredible advances in 3D technology, and certainly the remarkable talents of Tudisco, the realism achieved here is phenomenal. Nicely done.

Via Behance

Tudisco-01 Tudisco-02 Tudisco-03 Tudisco-04 Tudisco-05 Tudisco-06 Tudisco-07 Tudisco-08 Tudisco-09 Tudisco-10

It’s no secret that we are totally taken with graphical interpretations of the alphabet, conceptual typography, and works that are done as a series. This gem of a project, by Paris-based designer Alexis Persani, gets high marks all around. Persani’s 3D illustration work is stellar. It doesn’t feel like the 3D is a gratuitous effect, but rather advances the concept of the figures. He is thoughtful in his choices, and presents each character as a sculpture that could stand on its own, paying particular attention to texture, lighting and color. Fantastic series that can be enjoyed by type geeks like us, or just about anyone else. Well done.

More experimental typography posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

Persani-01 Persani-02 Persani-03 Persani-04 Persani-05 Persani-06 Persani-07 Persani-08 Persani-09 Persani-10 Persani-11 Persani-12 Persani-13 Persani-14 Persani-15 Persani-16 Persani-17 Persani-18 Persani-19 Persani-20 Persani-21 Persani-22 Persani-23 Persani-24 Persani-25 Persani-26 Persani-27

French illustrator Pez has a passion for pencil drawing, and it shows. Using different grades of pencils, Pez achieves stunning three-dimensionality. His attention to detail is truly awe-inspiring. And the composition of these sketchbook shots is impressive too.

Via Behance

Pez-1 Pez-2 Pez-3 Pez-4 Pez-5 Pez-6 Pez-7 Pez-8 Pez-9

%d bloggers like this: