Archives for posts with tag: thriller

Pop art is alive and well. Having materialized in the 1950s as an alternative to the traditions of fine art, the movement draws from popular culture and often relies on irony. As we’ve noted before, our highly connected, celebrity-obsessed culture is a breeding ground for such art, so it’s no surprise that it seems to be a particularly thriving art scene these days. And many artist have emerged as household names through the years, such as Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Roy Lichtenstein. Though not quite that prominent (yet), Brazilian artist and designer known as Butcher Billy has a tremendous body of work that pushes pop art forward, while also paying tribute to the past. Butcher Billy is “known for his illustrations based on the contemporary pop art movement. His work has a strong vintage comic book and street art influence while also making use of pop cultural references in music, cinema, art, literature, games, history and politics.” This is just a small sample of his extensive, diverse portfolio. If you didn’t know Butcher Billy’s work, now you do. Killin’ it, indeed.

Via Behance and curioos.com

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Who doesn’t love a good movie poster? The marriage of type and image is something that gets designers excited (us included). And some just really strike a balance. This take on the Stephen King novel turned movie by Belgian designer/illustrator Levente Szabó is one such example. We love the concept, executed in a fitting bold, graphic style. As well as the perspective of the illustration inside the axe silo. Though the size and placement of the type probably wouldn’t fly on a real movie poster, we do appreciate his choice of typeface… it compliments the bold, yet slightly rough illustrative style.

Via Behance

Szabo-1 Szabo-2 Szabo-3

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