Archives for posts with tag: Tiger Woods

Barcelona design firm Hey Studio has a thing for pop culture and illustration. They married these two loves into a fruitful serial project (others here and here and here) that has boosted their social media presence to over 50K Instagram followers. Though the project, called EveryHey, seems to have since ceased, Hey Studio posted over 400 minimalist illustrations of a very wide variety of pop culture figures, from Prince to Parker Lewis, to Baywatch babes to Beyoncé. We love Hey Studio’s bold, colorful style, and their smart choice of details to make each illustration just recognizable. This is a very small sampling, so be sure to check out the entire collection online or in their EveryHey book (available here).

Via Instagram

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There’s no doubt that in our image-obsessed culture particular iconic brands still have a certain cachet to inspire art. And that is, at least in part, a good indicator that they are iconic. These portraits by German-based illustrator/Designer Andy Gellenberg are a perfect example. Gellenberg painstakingly created these portraits in the likeness of a few sports icons, LeBron, Tiger and P-Rod, entirely out of the ubiquitous Nike swoosh. His sense of color and tone really shines here, using such a specific form to create a larger, very recognizable image. Pretty amazing.

Via Behance

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British artist Steve Payne marries 17th-century Russian general portraiture with our current celebrity-obsessed culture… with remarkable results. He uses digital copies of Napoleon-era portraits by English portraitist George Dawe, then quite seamlessly photoshops celebrity heads on top. “One thing I’ve always wanted to try is to incorporate someone into a painting, mimicking the painterly brush strokes and making everything fit and work nicely and look natural and stuff,” Payne says. “There’s an art to head swapping, I’ve seen so many awful attempts. The most important things to consider are anatomy, perspective and lighting. If you can get those things right, you’re more than halfway there. My artistic ability serves me well with this stuff, I can just tell if something looks wrong.” Just a small sample below, be sure to check them all out.

Via replaceface.tumblr.com

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