Archives for posts with tag: Time

Time-based photography can be powerful and very telling. And few know this better than Danish photographer Peter Funch. For nearly a decade, Funch photographed the ritualistic exodus from (presumably) home to work. Funch took up a post just outside of Grand Central Station in New York City, as morning commuters scurried the streets of Manhattan in the morning hour between 8:30 and 9:30 AM. Just as his new book’s title states, Funch’s fastidious documentation took place at the corner of 42nd and Vanderbilt. During the editing process, Funch began to notice patterns… the same folks were being captured days, weeks and even years apart (and often wearing the same outfits). And, often, these familiar strangers were traveling in packs next to or near each other daily, paying little attention to one another, day after day, week after week. Funch’s work captures these fascinating patterns and really speaks to cliches about the daily grind, monotonous routines of daily life… about the proverbial rat race.

Via peterfunch.com and Instagram

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We have a thing for series, as you might have noticed from many of our posts. And serial projects, in which artists produce artwork for a specified stretch of time, whether it be daily or weekly or monthly, are some of our favorites (here and here and here). We recently stumbled upon 36 Days of Type, a yearly open call inviting designers, illustrators and visual artists to share their view on the letters and numbers from our alphabet. Originally conceived by Barcelona-based designers Nina Sans and Rafa Goicoechea, this creative initiative has literally generated tens of thousands of entries, and is now in its third year. The work of Belgian designer Mario De Meyer caught our eye, and led us to a virtual treasure trove of typographic wonders. For the 2016 edition, De Meyer dove head first into his varying letterforms, producing a variety of beautiful designs, each worthy of standing on its own. De Meyer’s imagination seems boundless, integrating depth and a terrific sense of color into his compositions. We’re looking forward to seeing what De Meyer whips up for 2017!

Via Behance and 36daysoftype.com

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We’ve seen the work of Malaysian artist/architect “Red” Hong Yi before (here), but we had to revisit her work again because it’s just so good. This time, in keeping with her penchant for food-related art, Hong Yi created a portrait of international action star Jackie Chan’s face from chopsticks… 64,000 chopsticks to be exact. Suspended in bundles of various sizes from a steel frame and when viewed from a distance, the chopsticks bear an unmistakable likeness to the instantly recognizable famous face of Chan. We really admire out-of-the-box thinking like Hong Yi’s here. We have a hard time even gauging the amount of time and planning that went into this… such a creative expression of a brilliantly inspired thinker.

Via redhongyi.com

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Graffiti by its very nature changes the appearance of the surface on which it is displayed. But what happens when the “graffiti” itself continually changes as well? Delhi, India-based graffiti artist Daku (which literally means “bandit” or “dacoit” in Hindi… clearly a reference to the outlaw nature of graffiti art itself) explores this concept with his absolutely brilliant piece Time Changes Everything. Technically more public art than graffiti, Daku worked with St+art India Foundation, a non-profit organization that works on art projects in public spaces with accessibility of art as the main goal. Daku’s innovative work is basically a typographic sundial, where thoughtfully chosen words associated with change over the passage of time cast a shadow on a building’s facade by way of sunlight. From conception to execution, we are absolutely taken with this project. Mystery surrounding Daku’s actual identity may be part of his allure, but his overwhelming talent is crystal clear.

Via st-artindia.org and Instagram (daku156 and startindia)

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Okay, this is admittedly rather geeky in a way only designers can appreciate, so we are naturally very taken with it. Berlin-based artist/designer/drinker James Edward Murphy developed this clock that corresponds the numbers of the time in a 24-hour clock with hexidecimal color values. Simple concept, but the result is sort of mesmerizing. Time-lapse visual here. Having used it for a little while, we love checking back randomly to see what color it is. To take things a step further, UK web guru Jonic Linley recently turned the clock into a Mac screen saver (download it here).

Via scn9a.org

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Creativity manifests itself in different ways. We certainly appreciate well-planned, laborious works of art. But we also love seemingly effortless, spontaneous pieces that sort of continuously flow. German-born, New York-based Christoph Niemann is a prolific illustrator/artist, who bills himself as a visual story teller. And that moniker could not be more fitting. You may be familiar with his work, often featured in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The New Yorker, Wired, and others, as well as authoring a number of books. For his weekly Sunday Sketches series, Niemann employs mixed media techniques in some pretty terrific ways, then generously posts them to Instagram for general consumption. His use if everyday objects as part of his sketches is both clever and playful. Niemann seems to see the world through a different lens, creating design-envy worthy work with each piece. We’re definitely going to bookmark this and check back often. Well done.

Via Instagram and christophniemann.com

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