Archives for posts with tag: toy

You may recognize Perler beads from your childhood. or perhaps your children (or you) enjoy these tactile “pixels” today, whose novelty bucks the digital trend. One thing is for sure, these tiny fusible plastic beads have an appeal that transcends age and skill level. Romanian artist Claudiu Alexandru takes beading to a whole new level, having spent some 85 hours and 45,000 beads with little more than a pair of tweezers (and lots of patience) on his latest masterpiece. The result is quite something.

Via Facebook

Believe it or not, for being such a simple, uncomplicated product, Lego has some particularly clever and thought-provoking advertisements (here and here). Already three years old, this campaign celebrating 55 years of the Lego brand is basically a series of 55 visual riddles, fittingly featuring little more than the iconic bricks. The great minds at Swiss agency Cavalcade are behind these fantastically clever designs, which, much like Legos themselves, inspire a great deal of imagination. We must admit, we’re still struggling to solve many of these, but it’s so satisfying having solved the ones we did. Answer key to the few ads featured here at the bottom of this post. No peeking, try to figure them out for yourself!

Via Behance

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Answers (in order of images): Yellow Submarine, Alice in Wonderland, Three Little Pigs, Purple Rain, Jaws, Spider-Man, The White Stripes, Hunger Games, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Jackson 5, King Kong, Titanic, Stairway to Heaven, I Walk the Line, The Beatles, New Kids on the Block, Little Red Riding Hood, Clockwork Orange, Men in Black, Rolling Stones

A favorite pastime of many, during the holiday season and throughout the year, is assembling jigsaw puzzles. Children around the world usually start with an elementary 24-piece puzzle, and graduate to more advanced puzzles containing many more pieces. Australian artist/illustrator/designer Clemens Habicht has created perhaps one of the most difficult (and beautiful) puzzles we’ve ever seen. Even we as designers, who have a bit of an edge given our intimate knowledge in the nuances of color, see this is quite daunting. Rather than recreating an image, this puzzle requires you to assemble the pieces based on a CMYK color gamut. That’s right, a 1,000-piece puzzle made up of simple 1,000 different colored pieces. In his own words, Habicht discusses: “The idea came from enjoying the subtle differences in the blue of a sky in a particularly brutal jigsaw puzzle, I found that without the presence of image detail to help locate a piece I was relying only on an intuitive sense of color, and this was much more satisfying to do than the areas with image details. What is strange is that unlike ordinary puzzles where you are in effect redrawing a specific picture from a reference you have a sense of where every piece belongs compared to every other piece. There is a real logic in the doing that is weirdly soothing, therapeutic, it must be the German coming out in me. As each piece clicks perfectly into place, just so, it’s a little win, like a little pat on the back.” Sweet satisfaction, indeed. If/when we tackle this, we will be sure to post the result!

Via Tumblr and lamingtondrive.com

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We are all familiar with Cubism, but Rubik Cubism? French artist simply known as Invader coined the term when he began creating mosaic art out of Rubik’s Cubes. Each small colored square on the face of a Rubik’s Cube represents one pixel. Invader’s early works were representations of early 8-bit arcade game characters such as the digitized alien enemies from Space Invaders, and Pac-Man characters. His work has since evolved into much more detailed works, like recreating the Mona Lisa and Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Can.

Via space-invaders.com

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Lego lovers at heart will surely be taken by these awesome creations by French designer Thibaut Malet. Handmade of wood in limited editions of 20, these make an awesome gift. Hint, hint…

Via thibautmalet.com

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