Archives for posts with tag: transform

Not speaking to strangers is a lesson learned early and practiced often, but this fascinating ongoing photography series flies in the face of such prudence. Mumbai-based photographer Jay Weinstein attempts to break down barriers during this particularly vigilant time in world history, one smile at a time. Aptly titled “…so I asked them to smile”, this minimalist photography project explores the smiles of strangers, and how facial expressions truly transform perceptions and soften even the most hardened of appearances. Weinstein captures strangers in two different poses: one without a smile and one while smiling. See for yourself… with no other context (Weinstein does not provide life stories, names, occupations, confirmed religions or ethnicity), it’s striking to see how a simple smile can humanize a perfect stranger. Weinstein describes the genesis of this compelling sociological experiment in his own words: “December 2013. I was on a photography trip to Bikaner, in the deserts of Rajasthan, India. Near the busy train station, I saw a man I wanted to photograph. I hesitated. The look in his eye and his stony, stern face intimidated me. It’s always that moment of hesitation that kills a shot! I ended up avoiding him and photographing other subjects until I heard his jovial voice, “Take my picture too!” Camera lens focused, my finger poised to fire. ‘Smile’, I called out. And he was transformed. His face radiated warmth, his eyes sparkled with a humor I had completely missed. Even his posture softened. I knew then what my next project would be. So I asked them to smile was born. I wanted to document the effect of the human smile on a strangers face.”

Via soiaskedthemtosmile.com

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Upon quick initial inspection, it’s hard to tell what medium New York artist/photographer Sam Kaplan is working with. If you guessed sticks of chewing gum, you’d be right. Yes, these colorful, intricate, quite beautiful structures in the series he aptly calls Unwrapped are made of gum. We are big fans of art made from everyday objects (here and here and here), and Kaplan’s work fits nicely into that niche, but with a certain level of sophistication that really transforms the objects. We credit this to Kaplan’s superb implementation, not only by way of his thoughtful architectural prowess, but his masterful compositions and impeccable photography skills, which elevate each piece well beyond ordinary. This series would not be what it is in the hands of a less capable artist… we applaud Kaplan for his creative thinking and brilliant execution.

Via samkaplan.com and Instagram

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Organizing the Emerald City… #gumunwrapped

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Art with purpose and for social good can be really powerful. It can bring people together in unique ways that’s really touching, especially in this digitally connected, yet ironically isolating society we live in today. The work of Germen Crew, a Mexican youth organization comprised of muralists and street artists, to literally transform a village is a prime example. The government-sponsored project called Pachuca Paints Itself resulted in this magnificent mural, Mexico’s largest. Launched as an effort to not only rehabilitate the hillside neighborhood, but to also bring the community together, the Germen Crew project was a massive undertaking involving the painting of 209 individual houses. And the photos speak for themselves. Be sure to check out the video below (in Spanish). The vibrant, fluid composition seen from afar is truly awe-inspiring and heart warming. Just amazing.

Via Facebook and Instagram

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We are particularly taken with artists who revamp and re-envision everyday objects (here and here and here), giving new meaning to something very familiar. Berlin-based multi-disciplinary artist Sarah Illenberger is particularly adept at this approach, and we especially like her work involving food (which is reminiscent of the great Brock Davis). Illenberger’s conceptual and compelling work is not simply photography, but also art and design. Well known Berlin-based blogger Mary Scherpe says it best, “With a focus on analog craftwork using everyday items, Sarah is renowned for creating vivid, witty images that open up new perspectives on seemingly familiar subjects. Her ability to transform ordinary materials into complex and unexpected visual experiences has been utilized to develop concepts for clients from the fields of culture and business in several countries. In her aim to explore the fertile overlap between art and design, she’s collaborated with numerous photographers and artists, and filled exhibition spaces with self-initiated projects in Paris, Tokyo, and Berlin.”

Prints available here.

Via sarahillenberger.com

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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Alright a lot have ask for different angle of the Starbucks drawing.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Working on a new drawing.✨😊#wip Full video on my Facebook page Ivan Hoo Art.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Detail.;] #BoykoKolev inspired piece..More progress on my Tumblr @ivanhooart.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Given the sudden break in the weather (at least in the northeast), we thought it fitting to feature this mesmerizing series by New Jersey-based photographer Michael Massaia. We’ve all been there before, when the mood goes from delight to distress when you drop your ice cream on the ground, only to watch it slowly melt into oblivion. Massaia taps into the latter sensation with his Transmogrify still life photos. There is something captivating about the swirling remnants of Spider-Man and Dora the Explorer. Massaia not only captures interesting patterns and colors with these pieces, but he also awakens memories of summers past through these abstract, yet vaguely recognizable forms.

Via michaelmassaia.com

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Wood probably would not be a sculptor’s first choice to replicate ripples in clothing, flowing strands of hair, or someone emerging from water in a bikini after a swim. But Italian artist Peter Demetz sees no limits in his material of choice, which is what makes his work so remarkable. The incredibly lifelike details are truly awe-inspiring. Demetz’s familiarity with human anatomy, and his ability to transform a material that seems so rigid and inanimate is like nothing we’re ever seen. Also notable is Demetz’s sense of composition. Most of the figures’ backs are facing the viewer, often in some pensive moment that feels a bit sad and poignant through the authentic body language Demetz achieves with an almost photographic quality. Needless to say, Demetz is an immensely talented sculptor.

Be sure to check out the video below too… though it’s not in English, it gives a good sense of scale and process. Truly stunning.

Via peterdemetz.it

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There is something to be said about fan art. By its very nature, fan art is created as a sort of labor of love, and generally not commissioned or endorsed by the creators of the work from which the fan art derives. For Tumblr artist simply known as Punziella, Disney characters are her subject of choice. It’s not that often that we feature fan art, but Punziella is quite adept at transforming said Disney characters. She gives them a makeover, taking them out of whatever time period we’re accustomed to seeing them, and dresses them in current fashions. Not an easy task, but executed like a pro by Punziella. Nice work!

More fan art here, and Disney-inspired art here and here.

Via Tumblr

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The holiday season really is a time to honor tradition, and that manifests itself in different ways for different people. For us creative folk, it often involves producing some sort of holiday greeting. And for British photographer Peter Thorpe, it also involves his beloved dog Raggle (and a handsome food incentive as payment). For over twenty years, Thorpe has concocted increasingly elaborate holiday photos starring his (very cooperative) pet pooch, who he transforms through the use of good old fashioned costumes and staging (no Photoshop here). Imaginative, fun and inspiring work. Well done!

Via Blogspot

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London-based installation artist Rebecca Louise Law turns floral arrangements on their head, quite literally. Law’s stunning work often consists of thousands of individual flowers suspended overhead by copper wire, which is not only visually arresting, but also expresses her personal exploration of the relationship between humans and the intrinsic impermanence of flowers. It’s very clear that Law’s work really flourishes on a grand scale, and she is often commissioned by high profile clients, including Hermes, Jimmy Choo, Tiffany & Co, Royal Shakespeare Company, Max Mara, and others, to transform spaces in dramatic and beautiful ways.

More floral-related posts here and here and here.

Via rebeccalouiselaw.com

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