Archives for posts with tag: travel

Our penchant for serial works never diminishes. There’s just something about the natural order of things that is so satisfying. Glasgow-based illustrator/designer Jack Daly taps into that systemization while exploring his love of illustration, typography, and travel with his aptly titled Wanderlust Alphabet. And we have to say, the results, so far, are pretty great. It goes without saying that Daly is a terrific artist, and his adept use of color and sense of composition really make each of these pieces sing. Having just tackled the very beginning of the alphabet so far, Daly differentiates each letter/city with signature landmarks, architecture, local customs, etc. We are really taken with Daly’s style and cannot wait to see this alphabet grow. The possibilities are endless! In the meantime, prints available here.

Via Behance and Instagram

Advertisements

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

popsys-01 popsys-02 popsys-03 popsys-04 popsys-05 popsys-06 popsys-07 popsys-08 popsys-09 popsys-10 popsys-11 popsys-12 popsys-13

Tourism marketing is not something that we think of as terribly design-y. We just assume the process involves input from many people and interests, and therefor gets boiled way down from the designer’s original vision. But in the case of a Smoky Mountain Tourism campaign from several years back by Tennessee-based designer/creative director Shayne Ivy, that vision seems to have won out for the most part. We love Ivy’s style here, which lends itself really well to the concept and is beautifully executed. It’s even a bit reminiscent of other multiple exposure work (here and here), and most notably that by the great Olly Moss (here), which is certainly the highest compliment. It appears that Smoky Mountain Tourism has since shelved this campaign, but a resurrection may be in order… Ivy’s double exposure silhouette concept and treatments are far superior in our mind.

Via Behance

ivy-01 ivy-02 ivy-03 ivy-04 ivy-05

It is often said that art has a way of transporting viewers, whether conjuring past memories or sometimes through the immersion of visual stimulation. In the case of London-based Japanese photographer Chino Otsuka, such transport is a bit more literal, and turned on herself as both photographer and subject. Otsuka’s series Imagine Finding Me is a sort of conceptual time machine, where she digitally inserts herself into childhood photos. In her own words, Otsuka says, “A new journey has begun, on board a time machine built from digital tools. I’m traveling back, transported to places where I once belonged, cities where I once visited and on arrival I find myself from the past. Navigating through the labyrinth of memory I become a tourist of my own history. And throughout this unique journey I keep a diary.” We are absolutely taken with the concept, but it’s Otsuka’s adept skills with said digital tools that really make this series shine. In the hands of a less capable photographer, this would not have been nearly as effective. Huge success any way you look at it.

Via chino.co.uk

otsuka-01 otsuka-02 otsuka-03 otsuka-04 otsuka-05 otsuka-06 otsuka-07 otsuka-08 otsuka-09 otsuka-10 otsuka-11 otsuka-12

London-based illustrator/designer Federica Bonfanti designed this bucket list, of sorts, of places to visit before you die (complete with checklist to keep score). What catches our eye here is just how well rounded this piece is. The level of detail Bonfanti achieves in each “badge” is really something. Her keen eye for typography is spot-on, capturing some personality of each city. Each “badge” can certainly stand on its own (and some are actually for sale as individual prints). And her sense of color is also notable. Great piece any way you slice it… very inspiring.

Via federicabonfanti.com

Bonfanti-1 Bonfanti-2 Bonfanti-3 Bonfanti-4 Bonfanti-5 Bonfanti-6 Bonfanti-7 Bonfanti-8

Self-described one-man studio Neil Stevens has an appreciation for vintage type, as do many of us designers. There’s something pure about it, free from extraneous effects or trendy design devices. This collection of flight tag prints by the London based designer/illustrator captures the essence of a bygone design era (and would make a great inspirational addition to our studio walls, I might add). In his own words: “Recently I stumbled on a lovely set of old airline baggage tags and was amazed at the variety in designs produced since the 1950s. There was something about the now iconic, easily recognizable three letter abbreviations of the city destinations, and the small surrounding details that I thought would look great blown up and on a wall. They often avoided logos, had no advertising, and were purely just the information you needed.” Prints available here.

Via crayonfire.co.uk

Stevens-1 Stevens-2 Stevens-3 Stevens-4 Stevens-5 Stevens-6 Stevens-7 Stevens-8 Stevens-9

Though sort of a novelty, since most folks who visit this microsite won’t actually travel around Scandinavia, Volvo’s Cross Country Travels site and mobile app are really well designed and fun to navigate. Interactive Art Director Robert Lindström documents the creative process here. Love the badges too… nice uniformity among the variety of illustrations.

Via xctravels.com

For our fellow map geeks out there, this subway map-style diagram of U.S. interstate highways is not only attractive, but quite useful too. What an excellent idea, beautifully executed by Australian designer Cameron Booth. Upon close examination, it’s clear that this is not just an exercise in aesthetics, but it’s a pretty darn accurate map too.

Via cambooth.net

At quick glance these look like sketches. But Spanish photographer Pep Ventosa actually merges dozens of photos to transform our awareness of these highly familiar tourist locations, in what he calls “a celebration of our collective memory.” Nominated for the Photography Masters Cup in the International Color Awards, images in this series have an almost dream-like quality, rich with details and hazy layers. Ventosa himself says: “What grows is a unique new narrative space that never actually happened, where the whole has traveled mysteriously further than what the camera documented. Part memory, part imagination. Not unlike the way we see.”

Via pepventosa.com

Ukraine designer Alex Volkov has a knack for illustrating highly effective icons/teasers. This travel set is ridiculously stunning. Makes me sort of envious….

Via kadasarva.com

%d bloggers like this: