Archives for posts with tag: Tupac

Musical mashups often produce unexpectedly interesting results. The fusion of contrasting artists and genres can make for some pretty special compositions. Los Angeles-based artist (and United States Air Force Staff Sergeant) Corban Lundborg, also known as COLD, recently explored this concept visually after being commissioned to create artwork inspired by vinyl (hence the 12″ square design). Lundborg draws inspiration from both arresting and iconic vinyl logos, and his love of hip-hop. His series VINYL features hip-hop legends adorned with classic rock logos, and the result is terrific. But Lundborg doesn’t just haphazardly create these combos… his process seems much more thoughtful than that. Take “West Side of the Moon” for instance. Perhaps the strongest of the bunch, Lundborg places Pink Floyd’s famous Dark Side of the Moon logo over Tupac’s third eye, “inspired by his revolutionary message and social maturity. The refracting of light occurs when a wave enters a medium where its speed is different, and Tupac approached the music industry at an unmatched momentum.” Lundborg’s work, too, embodies a rebellious spirit that we really admire. His clear creative talent paired with his contemplative approach is a recipe for success. And we wish nothing but the best for this brilliant young artist’s future.

Via cold-studio.com

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Nostalgia is a prominent theme in art and design… simply a reflection of the human experience and human nature in general. We’ve seen it take many forms time and time again. Our latest find is a “bit” unexpected (no pun intended). Taking larger-than-life personas of rap and hip-hop artists, and minimizing them into pixelated 8-bit graphics may seem counterintuitive in this age of lifelike 3D avatars and such. But curiously enough, it works. This ever-growing collection of 8-bit characters is the brainchild of young UK artist A.Mulli (aka Adam Mulligan). A.Mulli’s low-res portraits pay homage to vintage arcade games like Street Fighter and Donkey Kong, imagining current hip-hop artists and rappers and other famous figures through the lens of a 1980s arcade character. Below are a few of our favorites. Keep ‘em coming, A.Mulli!

Via Instagram

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California-based artist and teacher Russell Powell gives new meaning to the term “hand painted.” Inspiring his young students and tens of thousands of Instagram followers, Powell has mastered the art of hand stamping, which is way more difficult than it sounds. We’re not talking elementary finger painting… Powell operates on a much higher artistic level. In short, he expertly paints (usually a portrait) on the palm of his hand, but does so rather quickly so it doesn’t dry. Then transfers it to paper or some other surface for preservation. It really is brilliant, and executed masterfully by Powell. Saying nothing of his stellar painting skills, conceptually it just works so well. The inevitable prints of his fingers and palm become an integral part of his work, making every single piece truly unique. One word: badass.

Via Instagram

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The decorative art of mosaics dates back thousands of years, yet this art form never ceases to amaze us (here and here and here). Artists continue to find new ways to push boundaries, creating intricate photorealistic works with a variety of materials. One such master is British mosaic artist Ed Chapman. Influenced by artists like Chuck Close, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jamie Reid, Chapman works with a variety of materials to create some incredible pieces, often inspired by music, movies, and pop culture in general. One particularly notable piece is Chapman’s Jimi Hendrix portrait comprised of thousands of Fender guitar picks. It was auctioned off several years ago for £23,000 (over $37,000) at Abbey Road Studios in London as part of Cancer Research’s Sound & Vision fundraiser. Chapman also creates works commissioned by private art collectors and corporations from around the world.

Via edchapman-mosaics.co.uk

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The landing page of Baltimore-based artist Joshua Budich’s website simply states “born to illustrate.” That’s a loaded declaration, but Budich certainly has the goods to back it up. His eclectic body of work is quite impressive, with an obvious love for pop culture. His style is reminiscent of comic book art, which lends itself to his familiar subjects from television, movies and music. Budich relies heavily on line work, and achieves some great, expressive details without overdoing it, or looking like he simply traced celebrities. He also has a great eye for composition and color, making his work recognizable now that we’re familiar with it (prints for sale here).

Via joshuabudich.com

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Hair styling is certainly a creative endeavor, but San Antonio-based barber Rob Ferrel, owner of Rob the Original Barbershop, has elevated it to an art form. Using the cranium as a canvas, and hair as the medium, Ferrel uses standard barber clippers and razors (and colored eyeliner for the finishing touches) to produce incredible portraits and other designs onto eager patrons’ heads. While working at a barbershop in Texas eight years ago, Ferrel recalls, local kids starting bringing in requests for hair art. “At first it was simple patterns and designs, but now if they bring me any image, I can replicate it in their hair,” Ferrel says. And, based on what we see here, we have no doubt that Ferrel can deliver. His work is amazing.

Via robtheoriginal.com and YouTube and Facebook

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Okay, so maybe we’re late to the party, but this mashup of rappers and cereal is one of our favorite Tumblr finds in a while. Tampa-based freelance art director/designer Brittany Meronek maintains this fantastic blog. Check out some of our favorites below. And be sure to check the blog often for new posts. You may even see a contribution from Barbour one day….

Via rappersandcereal.com and brittanymeronek.com

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