Archives for posts with tag: uncanny

At one time or another, we’ve all experienced the satisfaction of a perfectly timed photo. Being in the right place at the right time can be everything. Just ask Missouri-bred, New York-based photographer Jonathan Higbee, who capitalizes on those moments in his outstanding series “Coincidences.” Described as his “love letter to New York, and to the infinite number of magical, ephemeral and serendipitous moments that make it a city unlike any other,” Higbee credits his awe-inspiring collection of moments to exploring the streets of the Big Apple for over a decade. In his own words, Higbee explains, “This work explores the relationship city dwellers share with their chaotic, demanding urban environments. The pervasive and growing sources of overstimulation (giant glowing advertisements, traffic sounds, odors from food carts, etc.) all fight for the precious attention of passersby. “Coincidences” attempts to stabilize this instability and reveal the uncanny stories that arise when the crush of urban discord experiences brief moments of harmony.” Higbee’s work is harmonious, indeed… striking all the right chords from masterful composition to that element of surprise and delight, and often humor. Keep an eye out for Higbee’s forthcoming book featuring never before seen work!

Via Instagram

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Israeli photographer Rubi Lebovitch has a sort of subversive sense of humor, and for the record, we love it. Though his photographs themselves are pretty straightforward, Lebovitch has the uncanny ability to find the absurd in the ordinary. There’s a great cerebral quality to his work, in which the viewer is not guided by a predetermined story arc, but instead can deduce any number of things from his unexpected and beautifully absurd work. For his series Home Sweet Home, Lebovitch utilizes an intimate domestic setting for a veritable fun house. There is a certain charm in Lebovitch’s hyperbole, and ironically enough, you too can display it in your own home in a tidy coffee table book (available here). In his own words, Lebovitch discusses his book: “My photographs deal with domestic scenes captured in straightforward images…characterized by mystery, vagueness and absurdity. I create a twist in familiar sights and build new contexts, thus endowing the scene with new meanings. Mundane objects and domestic spaces are transformed into something strange and surprising. My images do not contain a clear-cut story or plot. The characters are inscrutable to the viewers and difficult to identify; their relationship with the world around them is senseless and they fail to communicate. Rationality is substituted by a twisted and exaggerated worldview. I employ a multiplicity of objects, allowing the objects to grow stronger and take over reality; they occupy and control the space. The scenes depicted in the photographs emphasize what usually remains hidden: the repressed, which cannot be described. The anxiety these scenes arouse undermines the peacefulness and security usually associated with home.”

Via rubilebovitch.com and loeildelaphotographie.com

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When we stumbled upon the work of Florida-based painter Matthew Cornell, we were really taken with his uncanny ability to paint water so realistically. But as we delved deeper into Cornell’s body of work, particularly his series entitled Pilgrimage, we realized there was much more to this talented artist. Sure, he has tremendous skill for painting in a realistic fashion, but there’s an emotional connection that one rarely captures in hyperrealism (some examples here and here and here). There’s something ethereal about Cornell’s work that transcends simply replicating a scene so well that it could be mistaken for a photograph. Perhaps it’s his own connection that comes shining through, but Cornell has a way of conveying real emotion with the notable absence of people. And we imagine this connection is even greater when viewing his extraordinary work in person. Don’t miss the trailer below to a solo exhibition last year.

Via matthewcornell.com

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