Archives for posts with tag: unconventional

Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”

Via mathery.it

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We certainly have a thing for creative food photography (here and here and here), so it’s no surprise that the inventive work of London-based photographer David Sykes caught our eye. Sykes looks at food from an unconventional perspective, and we particularly like the subtle injection of humor in his work. In fact, it’s not exactly food photography, but food-like. His keen eye for composition and smart use of color prove that Sykes is more than a quirky photographer, but a terrific conceptual artist.

Via davidsykes.com

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Milan-based designer/illustrator/author Gerald Bear seems to have a bunch of questions in that tremendously creative brain of his. And he answers many visually in his ongoing series Unconventional Heroes. What if all Doc Brown could afford was a Fiat (instead of a DeLorean)? What if Michael Knight did his life’s work from a talking VW Beetle? What if the Mystery Van was a Ford Thames van? Unconventional is a great adjective to describe these fantastic illustrations by Bear. He taps into not only a love of automobiles/transportation, but also a fascination with pop culture, and of course, the art of illustration. Bear marries these altogether in a pleasantly unexpected series that keeps us wanting more. Keep ‘em coming!

Via Behance

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We really admire Allison Supron’s artistic spirit. Supron, a young, New York City-based designer, shows her creative chops in all their glory in her project entitled “Play”. We love her compositions of unconventional materials that focus on working with ones hands, rather than relying on the computer. It’s a process Supron likens to childhood experiences. She explains, “What is purposeful play? Think back to the allotted time given in elementary school to finger painting, building with blocks, and storytelling. At the time these activities may have seemed simple and mindless, but they are all tasks that require the brain to think differently and promote creativity in the learning environment. Play is a colorful mixture of unconventional materials and techniques, hand-drawn typography, senior thesis paper tidbits, and photographs of each process from start to finish; a project geared to inspire hands to get off of the computer and get a little messy.” Great angle, with even better results. Way to go, Allison! We should all engage in this sort of thing from time to time….

Via allisonsupron.com

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Brooklyn-based photographer Jon Feinstein takes an unconventional approach to food photography in one of his latest projects. Rather than some sort of slick, carefully-lit setup, Feinstein has stripped his subjects from their familiar context, by scanning each (still-warm) item on a flatbed scanner. All the while, capturing a fascinating juxtaposition of the both “revolting and mouthwatering” nature of fast food. In his own words, Feinstein explains: “These photographs investigate the love/hate relationship that many Americans have with fast food, and, like many other aspects of popular culture, its ability to be simultaneously seductive and repulsive.”

Via jonfeinstein.com

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