Archives for posts with tag: unique

We feature fan art (here and here and here) from time to time… we are all about equal opportunity, and certainly feel there’s a place for such creativity. While some in the art community discount fan art because it is based on someone else’s original content, we are from the camp that believes fan art, though not necessarily a complete original expression of the artist because it is derived from already existing content, is a creative expression nonetheless. Fan artists add their own individual style, which is intrinsically expressive and unique. One such case is that of Montreal-based artist Dada, who has a clear penchant for Disney stories in particular. She draws familiar Disney characters not necessarily to mimic them exactly, but to present them in new and distinctive ways. Dada’s latest series merges beloved Disney heroes with their often maligned counterparts. Her drawing skills are impressive, and we love the process videos she often posts on social media. This nod to a very open and unfettered process of art making is certainly in the spirit of Disney, and just reinforces the sense that we all share a love and admiration for their wondrous storytelling. What fun it is to see these clear juxtapositions of good versus evil. Well done.

Via Instagram

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We love alphabet-based typography work (here and here), and artwork from everyday objects (here and here), so we are naturally drawn to this series, STRUCTURE x Type, by Indian design student Rigved Sathe. With form and structure in mind, Sathe created each individual letter from an object (or objects) corresponding to the letter. We love his use of subtle details, from the ghosted letter in the background, to the objects very subtly peeking in from all sides of the perimeter. Sathe has a terrific sense of composition, and his letterforms are quite unique. It’s amazing how typographic explorations of the alphabet itself never get old, and we’re very fond of this talented student’s take.

Via Behance

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When you think of 3D renderings, you immediately imagine some complex computer algorithm that miraculously adds a new dimension to something otherwise flat. With that notion in mind, the work of self-taught Serbian artist Nikola Čuljić will floor you. Not only is Čuljić an adept artist, mastering light and shadow with little more than colored pencils, markers and pastels, but he also has a computer-like mind for depth and dimension. Čuljić’s work is basically an optical illusion that confuses the viewer’s brain into thinking his drawings are somehow emerging from a flat paper surface, coming to life before one’s very eyes. Čuljić has smartly taken to social media with his unique work, racking up over 13K Facebook likes, nearly 16K Instagram followers and literally hundreds of thousands of YouTube views. Take a look for yourself… prepare to be amazed.

Via Facebook, Instagram and YouTube

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Pointillism, a painting technique in which distinct dots of color are applied in patterns to form an image, dates back some 130 years, though the technique is actually analogous to four-color CMYK printing process and RGB displays we designers are all too familiar with. Some of the most notable artists who have employed this technique are van Gogh and Seurat, but the art movement was relatively brief. But contemporary South African artist Gavin Rain makes a great case for bringing it back. Rain seems to have mastered the complex technique, as exhibited in his stellar body of work. In his own words, Rain explains that he developed his style “from the need to tell a story – to present a perspective. I usually dislike art that doesn’t communicate anything. I also hate it when I’m viewing art and I don’t know the message. I wanted to avoid that – everyone has to get my message – which is to step back.” We imagine Rain’s layering process takes quite some time, but the result is absolutely breathtaking. His unique perspective, and ability for visual conveyance, is just incredible.

Via gavinrain.com

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With summer almost upon us, we long for some beach days in the not-so-distant future. Which brings us to the awe-inspiring work of Australian seascape and ocean photographer Warren Keelan. If you’ve ever tried to capture photos of ocean waves, you know it’s no easy feat… much more difficult than it looks, with Mother Nature’s ever-changing variables, like motion and light, just to name two. But when done well, such images can be some of the most enthralling sights you’ll ever see. Keelan clearly has a gift, and seems at one with the mighty ocean, taking viewers on a journey and truly capturing the essence of the power and beauty of the sea. In his own words: “I’ve always had a fascination with nature, especially the ocean and its ever changing forms, and I am compelled to capture and share what I feel are special and unique moments in the sea. I love the raw, unpredictable nature of water in motion and the way sunlight brings it all to life, from both above and below the surface. For me, the challenge is creating an image that hopefully tells a story or leaves an impression on the viewer.” Keelan’s breathtaking work leaves an impression, no doubt about that.

Via warrenkeelan.com and Instagram

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California-based artist and teacher Russell Powell gives new meaning to the term “hand painted.” Inspiring his young students and tens of thousands of Instagram followers, Powell has mastered the art of hand stamping, which is way more difficult than it sounds. We’re not talking elementary finger painting… Powell operates on a much higher artistic level. In short, he expertly paints (usually a portrait) on the palm of his hand, but does so rather quickly so it doesn’t dry. Then transfers it to paper or some other surface for preservation. It really is brilliant, and executed masterfully by Powell. Saying nothing of his stellar painting skills, conceptually it just works so well. The inevitable prints of his fingers and palm become an integral part of his work, making every single piece truly unique. One word: badass.

Via Instagram

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#handstamp #create #rihanna #lion #wings #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends music by #eminem #rihanna @badgalriri

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🙏🏼 #handstamp #create #facepaint #mlk #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends #u2

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

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This one got away from me.. #handstamp #create #adele #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends @adele

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

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#handstamp #facepaint #create #michaeljackson #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

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#handstamp #facepaint #bodypaint #create #audreyhepburn #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

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Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”

Via mathery.it

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With the proliferation of digital photography, pared with editing software like Photoshop, photo retouching is basically the norm these days. There has certainly been some controversy (good example here) surrounding the practice, especially when it comes to the issue of misrepresentation. Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi specializes in digital manipulation, but with surprising effect that can even be described as unnerving. Turning retouching on its head, with her project Stockify, Borsi’s work clearly finds inspiration from legendary surrealist painters that came before her, most notably Picasso and Dali. Borsi brings the fundamentals of surrealist artwork, particularly unexpected juxtapositions, to the digital age with this arresting series. In her own words, “In this project I’ve been analyzing some fashion portraits, how perfect they are. So I made the opposite of retouching, somehow I distouched these pictures of perfect models. This project is connected to surrealist painters point of view: beauty wasn’t enough to give me interest. I love imperfections as much as I love surrealism. These pictures are my little monsters, no one wants to look like them, because they are totally unique.”

Via floraborsi.com

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We love an element of surprise in art, and the work of Spanish photographer García de Marina has plenty of if. In fact, much of de Marina’s work centers on the unexpected. His compositions are witty reinterpretations of everyday objects, seen through his unique lens. de Marina doesn’t just document objects, but distorts their meaning and purpose in clever and humorous ways. There’s certain accessibility to his work, that allows it to be enjoyed and understood through a visual language that transcends age and culture. Just brilliant.

Similar posts here and here and here.

Via garciademarina.net and Facebook

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The work of Foot Footie Boy is just simple fun. No, this is not high-brow art, or particularly intellectual or socially conscious. New Delhi-based aspiring artist Uttam Sinha has more than a foot fetish. He seems to see the world in a different light. Armed with nothing more than his phone and vivid imagination, Sinha adds sketches to photos of people’s feet. Okay, sounds sorta weird, even creepy, but it really is creative and fun. These simple composite works actually tell stories, and would probably make a terrific little coffee table book.

Via Facebook

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