Archives for posts with tag: urban art

At one time or another, we’ve all experienced the satisfaction of a perfectly timed photo. Being in the right place at the right time can be everything. Just ask Missouri-bred, New York-based photographer Jonathan Higbee, who capitalizes on those moments in his outstanding series “Coincidences.” Described as his “love letter to New York, and to the infinite number of magical, ephemeral and serendipitous moments that make it a city unlike any other,” Higbee credits his awe-inspiring collection of moments to exploring the streets of the Big Apple for over a decade. In his own words, Higbee explains, “This work explores the relationship city dwellers share with their chaotic, demanding urban environments. The pervasive and growing sources of overstimulation (giant glowing advertisements, traffic sounds, odors from food carts, etc.) all fight for the precious attention of passersby. “Coincidences” attempts to stabilize this instability and reveal the uncanny stories that arise when the crush of urban discord experiences brief moments of harmony.” Higbee’s work is harmonious, indeed… striking all the right chords from masterful composition to that element of surprise and delight, and often humor. Keep an eye out for Higbee’s forthcoming book featuring never before seen work!

Via Instagram

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We’ve seen art created from a wide variety of media, but nothing quite like this. As a matter of fact, if you had to guess how these were created just by looking at them, you’d probably have a hard time figuring it out. Relying on little more than brown packing tape, an Xacto and the filtering of light behind a translucent surface, Amsterdam-based artist Max Zorn’s work is awe-inspiring. The nuance in shading he achieves by layering tape is astounding all on its own. Never mind Zorn’s ability to manipulate the tape so intricately. It’s interesting how these works, composed of such an unexpected and artless material, are so beautiful. Zorn clearly has a penchant for the past, as indicated by his choice of subjects for the majority of his work. Interestingly, Zorn’s fondness for packing tape began as street art, as he describes in his own words: “There’s a lot of great street art by day, but it disappears after dark. I wanted to come up with urban art that uses nighttime as a setting, and there was nothing more inviting than the street lamps in Amsterdam. In the beginning I used packing tape to fill in larger sections of my marker drawings. Once I hung them on street lamps, the light’s effect opened up new ideas with ditching markers and just using tape.”

Via maxzorn.com and YouTube

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