Archives for posts with tag: whimsical

On this Election Day eve, perhaps the most historic U.S. election in our lifetime, a large swath of the population is bound to be unsatisfied with the outcome. With that in mind, we bring you a short video by Paris-based motion design studio Parallel that’s both amusing and unnerving. Though it has no relation to the election itself, it’s a terrifically animated short about everyday situations that are simply unsatisfying. The appeal of this video is twofold for us: not only is it highly relatable (we can honestly say that we’ve felt the frustration of every scenario depicted), but the quality of the work, from the overall style, use of color, animation and sound design, are totally on point. Having realized they really tapped into something, Parallel Studio is now conducting a challenge (here) to fellow animators no matter their skill level, to submit creative takes on other unsatisfying situations.

Via parallelproduction.tv

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Painting rocks is a favorite pastime of many, but Michigan artist/illustrator/designer/author/educator Aaron Zenz has taken it to a whole other level. In preparation for what is now known as the “most-attended public art event on the planet”, ArtPrize in Grand Rapids, Michigan (happening right now), Zenz and his six children collected and painted over 1,000 rocks over the course of a year. Zenz describes the project in his own words: “I painted them 7 solid base colors, representing myself and my six children. I invited these family members to fill the rocks with any kind of faces they wanted. All the rocks were painted in matching pairs. I took half of the rocks, 500, and arranged them outside the Children’s Museum in a sprawling display, creating a kaleidoscope of colors, shapes, and patterns. I took the other matching 500 rocks and hid them all over Grand Rapids in random locations. As your family enjoys the day at ArtPrize, keep your eyes open! You will notice details of GR streets like never before. How many of the 500 hidden rocks can you spot? Who in your party has the quickest eyes? When you spot one, leave it where it is and snap a photo. View and share photo discoveries on social media with the hashtag #RockAroundGR to get the complete community building experience.” What a fantastic undertaking on so many levels. With all the often somber headlines lately, this home-grown, positive interactive art experience is certainly a welcome highlight. We only wish it was closer! Think of it as a Stone Age Pokémon GO.

Via artprize.org

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Denver-based artist Jaime Molina has a very specific aesthetic. Clearly influenced by folk art, Molina’s work seems to be part of a larger narrative, complete with characters and such. We love it all, but are really taken with his 3D sculpture work, which has a whimsical, yet rustic feel. We particularly love how Molina uses nails to form the hair of his bearded characters. Though the nails are of varying sizes and seem to be placed almost haphazardly, there’s also a uniformity that’s really intriguing. Some of these intricate pieces even open to reveal a sort of center “skull”. Awesome work, so imaginative.

Via cuttyup.com and Instagram

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Transforming everyday objects into art holds a special place for us. It harkens back to childhood thoughts, when our minds wandered while staring out the car window at cloud formations that looked like other things. Or when we’d doodle with no purpose other than to document our own whimsical musings. These days, artists apply conceptual thinking to this cherished pastime, and the results are often special and surprising (here and here and here). Included among those artists is German-born, Australian-based Domenic Bahmann (aka Domfriday). What started as a personal exercise in creative thinking has since populated his Instagram page, which piques the interest of almost 60K followers. And, in turn, has even led to retail opportunities due to popular demand (here and here). In his own words, Bahmann explains: “In 2013 I started my own creative challenge called ‘Stop, Think, Make’. I had to come up with a new image or illustration at least once a week. Since then I try to see the world in the way I used to when I was a child. Staying playful and curious isn’t always easy in our busy modern world.”

Via Instagram

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Make no mistake, the captivating portfolio of Thailand-born, Sydney, Australia-based photographer/designer Peechaya Burroughs is no child’s play. Though her work is certainly whimsical and intrinsically approachable, it boasts no less artistic merit than fine art of a different nature. Burroughs’s minimalist approach to mostly hand-manipulated works is striking in a vast ocean of tricked out Photoshop work (which has merit in its own right, but the work of Burroughs is sort of refreshing in some ways). In her own words, Burroughs explains: “My photographs mainly consist of things that I create or manipulate by hand. Occasionally I use Photoshop when enhancing the idea and presentation of an image fits well. Driven by childhood memories and very much fascinated by children’s imagination and their quirkiness, the direction of my photography is light, easy to approach with a little touch of everyday optimism.”

Via peechayaburroughs.com and Instagram

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Negative space as a design device may look simple to the average person, but it’s actually quite complicated to effectively pull off. Few present-day artists know this better than illustrator/designer/artist Tang Yau Hoong. Malaysia-based Hoong has an awesome body of work (see previous post here), a good portion of which explores the interplay of positive and negative spaces. At quick glance, Hoong’s work is simple and fun, with inviting color palettes and pleasing compositions. But upon further inspection, there’s more to them, which is always a pleasant and impressive surprise. His work is fittingly popular on Threadless, and also available for sale here.

More negative space here and here and here.

Via tangyauhoong.com

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It’s often said that fashion inspiration comes from a really wide and diverse assortment of sources, and we’re certain food is one of them. The work of San Francisco-based artist Gretchen Röehrs makes for a pretty amusing and rather literal interpretation of such influence. Röehrs dresses up her whimsical fashion sketches with a variety of foods, manipulating everything from artichokes to oyster shells, to mimic the lines and curves of clothing. Deliciously du jour, indeed.

Via Instagram

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Creativity manifests itself in different ways. We certainly appreciate well-planned, laborious works of art. But we also love seemingly effortless, spontaneous pieces that sort of continuously flow. German-born, New York-based Christoph Niemann is a prolific illustrator/artist, who bills himself as a visual story teller. And that moniker could not be more fitting. You may be familiar with his work, often featured in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The New Yorker, Wired, and others, as well as authoring a number of books. For his weekly Sunday Sketches series, Niemann employs mixed media techniques in some pretty terrific ways, then generously posts them to Instagram for general consumption. His use if everyday objects as part of his sketches is both clever and playful. Niemann seems to see the world through a different lens, creating design-envy worthy work with each piece. We’re definitely going to bookmark this and check back often. Well done.

Via Instagram and christophniemann.com

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Few food items are more iconic than the beloved Oreo cookie. Introduced 103 years ago tomorrow (Happy Birthday, Oreo!), this sandwich cookie has long been recognized as the best-selling cookie in the U.S. With credentials like that, it’s no surprise that the Oreo brand has a massive advertising budget that allows for some terrifically creative campaigns. Its most recent, Play with Oreo, has spawned a commission of 10 global artists (Shotopop, Jeff Soto, Ryan Todd, McBess, Andrew Bannecker, Geoff McFetridge, Andy Rementer, Alex Trochut, Craig and Karl and Brosmind) to create Oreo-themed masterpieces. Spearheaded by advertising firm The Martin Agency, these whimsical ads will be showcased outdoors in New York City, Los Angeles and Indianapolis, and across Oreo social media channels, throughout March. Makes us wanna reach for a tall glass of milk, and dunk.

Via playwithoreo.com

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