Archives for posts with tag: white

In his latest project, HI-RES, Madrid-based artist Rómulo Celdrán explores the convergence of digital art and fine art through sculpture. Celdrán’s analytical curiosity is especially intriguing for designers like us, who are constantly analyzing, consciously or subconsciously, the visual qualities of otherwise mundane objects all around us. These large-scale, visually arresting creations are really something. Not only is it compelling to look at three-dimensional pixelation before your eyes, but Celdrán uses these works to comment on the role 3D computer modeling now plays on visual perception. In his own words, Celdrán discusses the project: “Just as photography did with the two-dimensional still image and film did with the moving image, the current digital technologies that are used to generate 3D image models are revolutionizing the way we look at reality, understand it and relate to it. Whether it is the world of 3D scanning, photogrammetry, 3D design or any of their multiple forms and applications (technical, medico-scientific, recreational…) the 3D digital model shows us a reality beyond reality, a hyper-real reality.”

Via romuloceldran.com

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Graffiti by its very nature changes the appearance of the surface on which it is displayed. But what happens when the “graffiti” itself continually changes as well? Delhi, India-based graffiti artist Daku (which literally means “bandit” or “dacoit” in Hindi… clearly a reference to the outlaw nature of graffiti art itself) explores this concept with his absolutely brilliant piece Time Changes Everything. Technically more public art than graffiti, Daku worked with St+art India Foundation, a non-profit organization that works on art projects in public spaces with accessibility of art as the main goal. Daku’s innovative work is basically a typographic sundial, where thoughtfully chosen words associated with change over the passage of time cast a shadow on a building’s facade by way of sunlight. From conception to execution, we are absolutely taken with this project. Mystery surrounding Daku’s actual identity may be part of his allure, but his overwhelming talent is crystal clear.

Via st-artindia.org and Instagram (daku156 and startindia)

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It was almost a year ago that we posted about an incredible collaboration between Russian photographer Alexander Khokhlov, makeup artist Veronica Ershova, and floral stylist Mikhail Kravchenko. They have teamed up again for a series of striking photos entitled Bloomshapes and Illusions, where they explore photographic portraiture adapted from a variety of influences, such as minimalism and symbolism. They even employ an element of illusion in their work, which makes it that much more special. Particularly notable is their use of flowers, like their remarkable Marge Simpson piece. Here, they employ brilliantly white blooms with great success. The attention to detail and sheer artistry that goes into these photographs is astounding, as exhibited in the video below. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again… can’t wait to see what they come up with next!

Via alexanderkhokhlov.com and YouTube

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We must admit, we have a certain fascination with messy things. There are definitely scholarly psychological studies on the matter, but our armchair psychologist observation falls somewhere in the realm of an innate human interest in discomfort, and how a visual mess makes one feel. While some are unfazed, others may be repulsed or attracted to a mess. We’re just scratching the surface here, in terms of experiences and the mental processes behind them, but San Diego-based photographer Keith Allen Phillips actually sets forth an intriguing series that got us thinking about this in the first place. Aptly entitled Messy, Phillips’s series verges on the subversive… naked women covered in a variety of messy foods. The results are actually sort of unexpected, and we almost forget about the food aspect, and focus instead on the mess, and how the models must feel (is it titillating, liberating, frustrating?). This thought-provoking series really does bring up so many feelings, exemplifying the true power of art.

Via keithallenphillips.com

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If you were thinking of invading any given place, the use of balloons would not likely be involved. Unless, of course, you’re an artist with a statement to make. Such is the case with French photographer/artist Charles Pétillon and his “Invasions” series. Pétillon uses white balloons of varying sizes as a way to “change the point of view that we encounter every day without regard to it. It is our view that I try to sharpen and to move from a practical perception to visual emotion.” Pétillon essentially fills spaces, both architectural and natural, with said balloons. The resulting visuals become metaphors for various themes. The house overflowing with balloons, for example, is a metaphor for family memories that spring from home. Pétillon says, “The white balloons symbolizing childhood naivety. This metaphor allows to ask us about family memory. How is it spread? Is it a universal need?” Other pieces in this visually arresting series include “Play Station 2,” a basketball net symbolizing the video game universe, and “Mutation 2” DNA structure symbolizing genetic modification. It must have been quite a feat handling such a massive amount of balloons, and still making them look quite beautiful and surreal.

Via charlespetillon.com

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