Archives for posts with tag: wood

We’ve seen the work of Malaysian artist/architect “Red” Hong Yi before (here), but we had to revisit her work again because it’s just so good. This time, in keeping with her penchant for food-related art, Hong Yi created a portrait of international action star Jackie Chan’s face from chopsticks… 64,000 chopsticks to be exact. Suspended in bundles of various sizes from a steel frame and when viewed from a distance, the chopsticks bear an unmistakable likeness to the instantly recognizable famous face of Chan. We really admire out-of-the-box thinking like Hong Yi’s here. We have a hard time even gauging the amount of time and planning that went into this… such a creative expression of a brilliantly inspired thinker.

Via redhongyi.com

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Denver-based artist Jaime Molina has a very specific aesthetic. Clearly influenced by folk art, Molina’s work seems to be part of a larger narrative, complete with characters and such. We love it all, but are really taken with his 3D sculpture work, which has a whimsical, yet rustic feel. We particularly love how Molina uses nails to form the hair of his bearded characters. Though the nails are of varying sizes and seem to be placed almost haphazardly, there’s also a uniformity that’s really intriguing. Some of these intricate pieces even open to reveal a sort of center “skull”. Awesome work, so imaginative.

Via cuttyup.com and Instagram

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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[Nutella.Spill.] #wip. #pastel on wood.

A post shared by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Spring is in the air (sorta), and with summer just around the corner, we thought a beach-related post was in order. A favorite pastime of many is spending warm sunny days building sand castles on the beach. They take many forms, from bucket molds, to deep moat formations, to the ubiquitous drip castle. A Massachusetts artist simply known as SandCastleMatt creates incredible sand structures that stand out from the rest. What’s unique about Matt’s work is that his designs almost look organic, like they naturally emerge from the beach. Using found objects, like sticks, vines, wood and other repurposed junk, Matt builds a framework to support his structures. Then he employs the classic drip method, which conceals the bones of his impressive ephemeral work. a few years back, a viral photo mistakingly identified one of his structures as the result of a lightening strike in the sand, which was later debunked by Scientific American (here).

Via Flickr and Vimeo

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Wood probably would not be a sculptor’s first choice to replicate ripples in clothing, flowing strands of hair, or someone emerging from water in a bikini after a swim. But Italian artist Peter Demetz sees no limits in his material of choice, which is what makes his work so remarkable. The incredibly lifelike details are truly awe-inspiring. Demetz’s familiarity with human anatomy, and his ability to transform a material that seems so rigid and inanimate is like nothing we’re ever seen. Also notable is Demetz’s sense of composition. Most of the figures’ backs are facing the viewer, often in some pensive moment that feels a bit sad and poignant through the authentic body language Demetz achieves with an almost photographic quality. Needless to say, Demetz is an immensely talented sculptor.

Be sure to check out the video below too… though it’s not in English, it gives a good sense of scale and process. Truly stunning.

Via peterdemetz.it

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We find the manipulation of wood just fascinating. In the right hands, the possibilities are endless. In its natural state as trees, wood can obviously be quite beautiful. But the notion that an artist can create objects that harken back to their natural state, even after having served a function, is really quite something. The extraordinary work of Paris-based French-Argentinean artist and designer Pablo Reinoso speaks to this very idea: “For the series entitled Spaghetti Bench, Pablo Reinoso used public benches, which are anonymously designed and travel across cultures with an out-of-time, old-fashioned quality, as a starting point for his reflections. Started in 2006, these new creations have multiplied and found homes in very diverse places. In line with his work on Thonet’s chairs, the artist explores once again the seat as object. Yet this time it is no longer the object but matter that frees itself from its function and pursues its fate of wood, tree, plant. Reinoso stages benches that, after having accomplished their task as furniture, revert into growing, climbing branches. This freedom is expressed in a movement that embraces architecture, wandering through places, exploring their nooks and crannies, and giving free rein to its whims.” The fluidity of his work, juxtaposed with the perceived functionality of the traditional park bench, makes for some thought-provoking art. Each seems to tell a story. We are particularly taken with the Romeo and Juliette bench that climbs a balcony overhead. Incredible.

Via pabloreinoso.com

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There has been a sort of renaissance of great movie (and TV) posters lately, and we’ve featured some of them here and here and here. Brooklyn-based studio SpaceWolf Limited takes the art of said poster design to another place (space, perhaps?) with their limited edition laser engraved wood posters. Yes, you heard that right… wood! Sure, this is a very niche product that seems geared toward (fellow) design/pop culture/sci-fi geeks. But there is a level of artistry and precision to be appreciated by just about anyone. We love the intricate details and beautiful contrast they achieve. Because these are (very) limited editions — just 50 hand signed an numbered pieces per design — the rotation of posters is constant. We look forward to future editions… these make great gifts (hint hint). Other products, including jewelry, journals and iPhone skins, available here.

Via spacewolflimited.com and Instagram

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When London-based designer Alexander Klement sets a personal design goal, he follows through in a big way. And his Lathe typeface is a shining example. As fellow designers, we understand that typeface design is no easy task. How do you create something fresh and new, when it has been done over and over in so many ways? Klement certainly created something we’ve never seen before. There’s great dimension to his figures, and we love how he explored various textures. Each character also stands quite nicely on its own. In his own words: “I decided not to design a typeface from scratch as there are so many great ones out there I could just add a personal touch to an existing one. I chose Futura as a base typeface for its simple, clean and modern characteristics. I started by creating a base generative extrusion which was applied to each character. Materials were then explored and applied to the characters to give a sense of a real life object.” Well done.

Via alexanderklement.co.uk

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We’ve seen the terrific typographic work of Bilbao, Spain-based designer Txaber before (here). His latest work, a custom typeface for Nike is a great addition to his body of work. It’s composed of wooden slats, but for some added texture and dimension, Txaber curls the top layers. And the result is quite beautiful.

Via txaber.net

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German-born, California-based artist Andrew Myers experiments with light and shadow in his latest series, We Don’t Belong in the Shadows. These incredible portraits are composed of thousands of screws, wood, paint and phone book pages. Though we’re sure these photos don’t even do them justice, Myers’ masterful compositions are really something, carefully placing screws in such a way to reveal shadows around the contours of these faces. Be sure to also check out this video for a closer look.

Via andrewmyersart.com and Facebook

 

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