Archives for the month of: July, 2014

Russian-born surrealist painter and sculptor Vladimir Kush sees the world from a very unique perspective, and shares that vision with the world through his extraordinary work. We can’t help but compare these fascinating (and sometimes perplexing) visions to the work of Salvador Dalí. Although his style is often described as surrealist, Kush himself refers to it as “metaphorical realism”, as he describes in his credo: “Any metaphor has its own story to tell. Metaphor “sees” through centuries, unveiling the images of the world and connecting notions created by civilization. At the same time, metaphor can easily reflect the complexities of our modern life, with its ambiguity and contradictions. The painter’s mission is to find a metaphorical “parallel” for every side of real life. The element of unexpectedness will shake up the viewer and awaken his artistic nature.” Such unexpectedness abounds in Kush’s work… we find ourselves making new discoveries each time we look.

Via vladimirkush.com

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Um, wow. That’s our initial reaction to the impressive work of Paris-based illustrator Helena Hauss. These days, being a fantastic illustrator isn’t necessarily enough to stand out in a very crowded landscape of creative professionals. Hauss finds her sweet spot in her love of the color blue. A good portion of her work is done with blue ballpoint pens, and the results are stunning. Hauss is detail oriented, and it shows. Hauss explains, “I draw very large pieces of art (usually around 100cm x 70cm) that allow me to really go into details of hair, patterns and typography, all in Bic pens, with bright and contrasted colors. My style of drawing has never been something quite conscious. It just kind of happened, for different reasons that had nothing to do with choice. For example, I have always had a big attraction for the color blue, so much so that all my clothes and accessories were a shade of it, so when I drew I very much liked using blue ink, such as the one found in Bic pens.” Her style is fresh, and her abilities are amazing. We love her work and expect to see more from her in the future.

Via helenahauss.net

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The typographic stylings of Australian illustrator/designer Christopher Haines are on point. We love his fresh take on this set letterforms from A to Z. This alphabet sort of evolves and shape shifts, from swooshy distortion of the letter C to the sneaker-inspired letter M to the full-on venomous viper wrapped around the letter W. Haines clearly draws inspiration from sports, and has a great attention to detail, thoughtfully building each form that could stand on its own.

Via Instagram

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Los Angeles-based Russian artist/designer Sasha Vinogradova is wicked talented. While his portfolio is filled with outstanding design work for TV and movies, we are particularly taken with his venture into a more fine art direction. Vinogradova created a series of prints that demonstrates a marriage between Russian and Mexican artwork by way of ornately decorated skulls. The pairing of distinct Russian folk art styles with the indigenous Mexican skull theme works so well in such an unexpected way… Vinogradova employs Zhostovo, Khokhloma, Gzhel, Gorodets, Mezen and North-Dvina styles. In his own words, Vinogradova explains: “I did this thing recently, to show different styles of Russian folk painting. I think on skulls it looks fun and new. Also it slightly reminds me of Día de Muertos.”

Via sashavinogradova.com and Behance

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Having just dabbled in a bit of interior design ourselves with the renovation of one of our studios, we’ve become particularly aware of some exceptional furnishings lately. And this is one super example. Designed and developed by Spanish duo Ramón Úbeda and Otto Canalda, Up In The Air table is a thoughtfully conceived piece of art that also happens to double as a side table. Each cylindrical piece is constructed out of a patented environment-friendly resin with handmade fish replicas. In the designers’ own words: “Fish that aren’t fish. That seem to float in water that isn’t water. They seem to be suspended in air that isn’t air. Like a dream.”

Via viccarbe.com

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Japanese sculptor Tomohiro Inaba’s unique approach is striking. Some of his work, consisting of steel wires of varying densities, almost looks like it’s moving. The subject matter of many of these pieces is animals… they start off in full form then dissolve into a tangled web of wire. Inaba achieves an awesome impression of movement, like an organic form transforming into a digitally knotted mass.

Via tomohiro-inaba.com

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Dutch artist Guda Koster creates living sculptures with actual people, which result in these terrific photographs. Influences of fashion, interior design and even theater are evident in her work. In her own words, Koster’s work serves as social commentary: “I make installations, sculptures and photographs in which clothing plays an important part. Clothing doesn’t just have a function but also conveys a message. In our everyday lives we communicate identity and social position primarily by means of our clothing. Clothing can be seen as a visual art form that expresses the way we see ourselves and our relationship with the world around us.” The titles of these works include Red With White Dots, Cloud, Stairway to Heaven, Fear of Grey Mice, Girl, and Happy Birthday.

Via gudakoster.nl

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Hair styling is certainly a creative endeavor, but San Antonio-based barber Rob Ferrel, owner of Rob the Original Barbershop, has elevated it to an art form. Using the cranium as a canvas, and hair as the medium, Ferrel uses standard barber clippers and razors (and colored eyeliner for the finishing touches) to produce incredible portraits and other designs onto eager patrons’ heads. While working at a barbershop in Texas eight years ago, Ferrel recalls, local kids starting bringing in requests for hair art. “At first it was simple patterns and designs, but now if they bring me any image, I can replicate it in their hair,” Ferrel says. And, based on what we see here, we have no doubt that Ferrel can deliver. His work is amazing.

Via robtheoriginal.com and YouTube and Facebook

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Apologies, we’ve been on a bit of a blogging hiatus while busy with client work and some studio renovations.

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