Archives for posts with tag: beach

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

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Some “tree huggers” may view paper art (here and here and here) as a gratuitous use of precious paper. But Spanish paper artist Malena Valcárcel may just have found a way to please art lovers and environmentalists alike. Valcárcel “upcycles” discarded or recycled books into quite beautiful sculptures. She is astoundingly self-taught, and her work is intricate and delicate in a way that serves the fine print of her chosen medium (printed matter) really well. She even utilizes lighting in some of her pieces, which adds an entirely new magical dimension. In her own words, “My main inspirations come from nature and everyday life, and I often return to certain ideas again and again. Flowers, trees, butterflies, houses, clouds … without forgetting the sea, really fascinate me. Turning books into sculptures, cutting and shaping paper into different shapes or abstract forms never ceases to amaze me, and when the work is finished, just contemplating it brings a smile to my face. Making things has always been incredibly important to me and it is often an amazing release to get it out of my system. It’s a joy to hunt for things for my work…the lost, found and forgotten all have places in what I make. Most of my pieces use recycled materials, not only as an ethical statement, but I believe they add more authenticity and charm.” Charming, indeed.

Via Behance and Etsy

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With summer almost upon us, we long for some beach days in the not-so-distant future. Which brings us to the awe-inspiring work of Australian seascape and ocean photographer Warren Keelan. If you’ve ever tried to capture photos of ocean waves, you know it’s no easy feat… much more difficult than it looks, with Mother Nature’s ever-changing variables, like motion and light, just to name two. But when done well, such images can be some of the most enthralling sights you’ll ever see. Keelan clearly has a gift, and seems at one with the mighty ocean, taking viewers on a journey and truly capturing the essence of the power and beauty of the sea. In his own words: “I’ve always had a fascination with nature, especially the ocean and its ever changing forms, and I am compelled to capture and share what I feel are special and unique moments in the sea. I love the raw, unpredictable nature of water in motion and the way sunlight brings it all to life, from both above and below the surface. For me, the challenge is creating an image that hopefully tells a story or leaves an impression on the viewer.” Keelan’s breathtaking work leaves an impression, no doubt about that.

Via warrenkeelan.com and Instagram

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Spring is in the air (sorta), and with summer just around the corner, we thought a beach-related post was in order. A favorite pastime of many is spending warm sunny days building sand castles on the beach. They take many forms, from bucket molds, to deep moat formations, to the ubiquitous drip castle. A Massachusetts artist simply known as SandCastleMatt creates incredible sand structures that stand out from the rest. What’s unique about Matt’s work is that his designs almost look organic, like they naturally emerge from the beach. Using found objects, like sticks, vines, wood and other repurposed junk, Matt builds a framework to support his structures. Then he employs the classic drip method, which conceals the bones of his impressive ephemeral work. a few years back, a viral photo mistakingly identified one of his structures as the result of a lightening strike in the sand, which was later debunked by Scientific American (here).

Via Flickr and Vimeo

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There is tremendous beauty in nature, and even some not visible to the naked eye. Take grains of sand, for instance. Much like snowflakes, no two grains are alike. But Hawaii-based Dr. Gary Greenberg reveals a beautiful, colorful tapestry of tiny shells, coral fragments and weathered crystals through his magnified photographs. Greenberg, a former photographer and filmmaker who later earned his Ph.D. in biomedical research, invented and developed high-definition, three-dimensional light microscopes that make this sort of photography possible. His impressive sampling for this photographic series features grains from beaches around the world, which he magnifies up to 300 times to expose “hidden and unexpected aspects of nature.” In his own words, Greenberg explains that his mission is to “reveal the secret beauty of the microscopic landscape that makes up our everyday world.” And that “art is a doorway through which we can more deeply embrace nature.”

More extreme close-ups here and here.

Via sandgrains.com

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Part photojournalism, part fine art photography, Munich-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s “Aerial Views Adria” project plays to a variety of senses. These extraordinary photographs not only satisfy our own desire for visual symmetry and orderliness, they also feature a pleasing spectrum of colors. Perhaps the most amazing thing about this series is that it’s not Photoshopped. Lang captured authentic aerial views of seaside resorts at the Adriatic coastline in Italy, between Ravenna and Rimini. Be sure to check out his body of work, it’s really quite something.

Via bernhardlang.de and Behance

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New York City-based photographer Barry Rosenthal has a thing for sorting. In his series “Found In Nature,” Rosenthal builds fascinating compositions from discarded items found along the beaches of New York Harbor. Rosenthal’s orderly masterpieces, comprised basically of abandoned junk, are sorted by type, color and/or theme, and each piece tells a unique story. In his own words, Rosenthal talks about his piece titled “Plastic Puzzle”: White plastic objects. The ‘beaches’ I walk are not the places that families go for sun and surf. They are overlooked wetlands. This composition came about from my experiments with perspective. My theme is simple; make a puzzle from the objects. This my first collection of objects post Hurricane Sandy. My usual hunting ground was not accessable. It had become a FEMA staging area for the Rockaways. I was forced to find new, fertile tidal areas to clean or glean a theme.

We are really fond of Rosenthal’s thoughtful and compelling compositions. And we, too, have a thing for organization and order; see previous posts on the subject here and here and here.

Via barryrosenthal.com

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