Archives for posts with tag: London

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

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It is often said that art has a way of transporting viewers, whether conjuring past memories or sometimes through the immersion of visual stimulation. In the case of London-based Japanese photographer Chino Otsuka, such transport is a bit more literal, and turned on herself as both photographer and subject. Otsuka’s series Imagine Finding Me is a sort of conceptual time machine, where she digitally inserts herself into childhood photos. In her own words, Otsuka says, “A new journey has begun, on board a time machine built from digital tools. I’m traveling back, transported to places where I once belonged, cities where I once visited and on arrival I find myself from the past. Navigating through the labyrinth of memory I become a tourist of my own history. And throughout this unique journey I keep a diary.” We are absolutely taken with the concept, but it’s Otsuka’s adept skills with said digital tools that really make this series shine. In the hands of a less capable photographer, this would not have been nearly as effective. Huge success any way you look at it.

Via chino.co.uk

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Architectural photographer and (self-described) “aviation dork” Mike Kelley has found a new and intriguing way to capture commercial airliners. If you’ve seen one YouTube video of airplanes taking off and landing (yes, that’s a thing… proof here, with over 2 MILLION views), you’ve seen them all. But Los Angeles-based Kelley documents these aircraft in a whole new way. What if you saw a flock of jumbo jets taking off or landing? Amazing sight, right? This talented photographer captures these very scenes in his brilliant series, cleverly titled, Airportraits. Kelley has spent the better part of nearly two years photographing airplanes and airports. After his initial piece, Wake Turbulence, a day’s worth of takeoffs from LAX’s south runways composited into a single image, took off (pun intended) via social media and subsequently named one of the top images of 2014, Kelley mapped out a plan to capture the “inherent beauty in aviation” through similar composite images from airports around the globe. The result is absolutely awesome, from shooting the underbelly of planes from Dockweiler Beach in Los Angeles departing around sunset, to the descent of morning rush arrivals at London’s Heathrow Airport. For fellow aviation dorks in your life (or folks like us who appreciate stellar photography in general), prints available here.

Via mpkelley.com and Instagram

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Sure, we’ve seen paper cut art before (here and here and here), and we’re very fond of it, by the way. But we’ve never seen anything quite like this. London-based artist/photographer Rich McCor (otherwise known as @paperboyo) brilliantly pairs his paper cut skills with his keen eye for photography. And the results are clever, playful and unexpected. McCor’s carefully crafted silhouettes are brought to life against sometimes familiar and iconic backdrops. While his work may seem simple in concept, there’s no doubt in our minds that these smart compositions require much more skill than one may think. Needless to say, we are thoroughly impressed and inspired. And his growing base of 175,000 Instagram followers would surely agree.

Via Instagram

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Initially drawn in by typographic papercraft, we quickly realized the portfolio of Lobulo was a treasure trove if dynamic designs. Splitting time between London and Barcelona, Lobulo Design is actually just one man: Javier Rodríguez García. His penchant for working with paper has gained him much respect, and even a viral following online. The well-produced short videos he posts on social media give a nice behind-the-scenes glimpse at Lobule in action, feeding that central hunger for all-access documentation (see some below). The intricacy of Lobulo’s work is striking, and his sense of color and space outstanding. We especially appreciate work that is outside of our comfort zone, and this certainly falls into that category. Just awesome.

Via lobulodesign.com

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The late great David Bowie has been a cornerstone of pop culture for decades. So it’s no surprise that visual artists around the world have paid tribute to him and his chameleon-like persona over the years. Here’s a sampling of some of our favorites. R.I.P. David Bowie

 

Pablo Lobato (Buenos Aires)
Via Flickr
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Vincent Altamore (New Jersey, USA)
Via Blogspot

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Ed Chapman (London) see previous post here
Via edchapman-mosaics.co.uk

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Marta Zawadzka (Poland)
Via martagallery.com

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Steve Payne (UK) see previous post here
Via Tumblr

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Karen Clark (New Jersey, USA)
Via Facebook

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We certainly have a thing for creative food photography (here and here and here), so it’s no surprise that the inventive work of London-based photographer David Sykes caught our eye. Sykes looks at food from an unconventional perspective, and we particularly like the subtle injection of humor in his work. In fact, it’s not exactly food photography, but food-like. His keen eye for composition and smart use of color prove that Sykes is more than a quirky photographer, but a terrific conceptual artist.

Via davidsykes.com

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Design really is all about communication and education, whether its purpose is to sell, explain, or simply draw attention. In the case of this brilliantly clever self-initiated poster, the visuals do all the work to raise awareness of an often ignored issue facing sharks in their, well, house (more about that here). A collaborative effort between Italian-born, San Francisco-based 3D master Matteo Musci, and London creative studio, Featherwax, which specializes in retouching and CGI, this striking poster does a terrific job of immediately drawing the viewer in with its arresting visuals. Inspired by an iconic movie poster, this piece’s strength is in its irony. In their own words, the duo explains: “An in-house concept to promote awareness for shark-culling, and the number of sharks killed annually. Due to the demonization of sharks, it’s often an overlooked issue. The concept here is to compare the number of deaths each species cause each other, and visually turn that fear on its head. The Jaws poster naturally springs to mind, and can be viewed as a boat full of harpoon-guns.”

Jaws related posts here and here and here

Via Behance

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Original JAWS poster:

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While fashion and still life photography can be very straightforward, we’re always pleased when we see it take a conceptual turn. London-based Lithuanian photographer Aleksandra Kingo is particularly adept at elevating her work to art. Her personality shines through, and makes for some very compelling work. In her own words, her work is “feminine, a bit awkward and full of irony. She believes that photography should be personal and loves the possibility of creating any kind of world through her medium. Most of her work is based around people and their identities and she gains a lot inspiration from everyday life stories as well as popular culture.”

Via aleksandrakingo.com

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So, we stumbled upon this viral video recently, and were in complete awe. You will be too, if you haven’t seen it already, guaranteed. It made us ponder the irony of being so taken with corporate logos carefully drawn by hand, even though that’s exactly how they were developed in the not so distant past. It’s no wonder this video has circulated so rapidly… we live and design in a time when doing things without the use of a computer is such a novelty. Armed with little more than some calligraphy pens, London-based Seb Lester, a trained graphic designer with a penchant for calligraphy, miraculously recreates distinct and recognizable complex letterforms with complete ease and surprising accuracy. Sit back snd marvel, as these logos seem to just emerge from his steady hand. We bow down to Lester and his tremendous talents.

Compilation video below, plus a few of our other favorites follow. Can you guess what’s about to materialize as he starts each logo?

Keep up with Lester and all of his hand drawn logos on his various social media channels: Instagram, Facebook, Vimeo, YouTube, Twitter

Via seblester.com and Vimeo

More doodling.

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Harry Potter

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I doodle a lot.

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Latest doodle

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News doodle

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